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Raumfahrt - China Change-4 Mondsonde auf Mond Rückseite gelandet! - Update-13

11.07.2019

China's Chang'e-4 probe switches to dormant mode

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Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to dormant mode for the lunar night on the far side of the moon on Tuesday morning (Beijing Time).

The scientific instruments on the Chang'e-4 probe worked well during the seventh lunar day after the probe made the first-ever soft-landing on the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

A new batch of 1.2 G scientific detection data obtained by the probe was sent to the core research team for analysis in early July.

A lunar day equals 14 days on Earth, and a lunar night is the same length. The Chang'e-4 probe switched to a dormant mode during the lunar night due to the lack of solar power.

As a result of the tidal locking effect, the moon's revolution cycle is the same as its rotation cycle, and the same side always faces Earth.

The scientific tasks of the Chang'e-4 mission include low-frequency radio astronomical observation, surveying the terrain and landforms, detecting the mineral composition and shallow lunar surface structure and measuring neutron radiation and neutral atoms.

The Chang'e-4 mission embodies China's hope to combine human wisdom in space exploration with four payloads developed by the Netherlands, Germany, Sweden and Saudi Arabia.

Quelle: Xinhua

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Update: 8.08.2019

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New Images from China’s Chang’e 4 as Eighth Lunar Day Ends

China’s Chang’e 4 mission is continuing its science and exploration work on the farside of the Moon, having completed its eighth lunar day of activities on Wednesday.

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This composite image showing the shadow of the Yutu-2 rover, roving tracks, and the distant Chang’e 4 lander was taken during lunar day 7.
CNSA / CLEP

China's Chang’e 4 lunar lander and Yutu 2 (Jade Rabbit 2) rover powered down at 9:00 and 9:50 Universal Time (UT), respectively, on August 7th, just under 24 hours ahead of local sunset, according to an update (Chinese) from the China Lunar Exploration Program (CLEP).

The Yutu 2 rover has now covered a total of 271 meters (890 feet) since its deployment and continues to make its way west of the landing site in Von Kármán Crater. Chang'e 4 landedin the 180-km-diameter (112-mile) crater, which lies within the immense South Pole-Aitken impact basin, following local lunar sunrise on January 3rd. NASA’s Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has been tracking Chang'e 4's progress as it passes overhead.

Despite passing its design lifetime of three lunar days, or three Earth months, Yutu 2 is apparently continuing to drive well. The rover has even increased its drive distance in recent lunar days, driving 33.13 meters during lunar day 8, the farthest since the 43 meters it covered in lunar day 3. The rover has adapted to and overcome earlier issues that arose when reflections from the craft triggered obstacle alerts.

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This map of Yutu 2's drive was produced by space exploration historian and cartographer Phil Stooke. The route for lunar days 6, 7 and 8 are early estimates.
Phil Stooke

Science Returns

While traversing the complex lunar terrain, Yutu 2 is also carrying out several science objectives. Progress is slow because, while the rover is solar powered, it actually shuts down for six days in the middle of the 14-day period of sunshine, a precaution against the high, direct solar radiation over the landing site. That leaves just over three days on each side of these "naps" for roving and measurements.

Nevertheless, the rover is returning intriguing results. A mission source told this reporter that the Lunar Penetrating Radar (LPR) experiment aboard the rover has returned "very interesting radar data for lunar subsurface analysis" along the roving route. A paper on the data has been submitted and is awaiting acceptance and publication.

That paper will follow first science results published inMay in the journal Nature, which were based on in situ observations made by the Visible and Near Infrared Spectrometer, another payload aboard Yutu 2. The data indicate the presence of materials that might have originated from below the Moon’s crust. The find is in line with the idea that the impact that created the South Pole-Aitken Basin may have excavated material from the lunar mantle.

Science will also soon be coming from the Queqiao relay satellite, which facilitates communications between Chang'e 4 and Earth from its halo orbit around the Earth-Moon L2 Lagrangian point. The satellite also carries the Netherlands-China Low-Frequency Explorer (NCLE), a pathfinder experiment for low-frequency radio astronomy. The instrument's five 3-meter-long antennae are slowly being deployed in intervals to allow testing and calibration. In the coming months, NCLE will begin observations across a frequency range between 1 and 80 MHz; observations below 30 MHz are only possible in space.

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Longjiang 2 was orbiting the Moon when it captured the July 2nd total solar eclipse over the Pacific Ocean. Harbin Institute of Technology

Second Farside "Landing"

China’s second visit to the farside of the Moon came on July 31st, but it wasn't a soft landing. A tiny, 47-kilogram satellite that launched with Queqiao, Longjiang-2/DSLWP-B, collided at high speed with the Moon. The mission, which lasted over a year, was part technology verification and part pioneering amateur radio and imaging satellite.

Based on earlier mission behavior, Yutu 2 will likely begin lunar day 9 activities on August 24th, around 24 hours after local sunrise. The Chang’e 4 lander will then wake up another 24 hours later.

Quelle: Sky&Telescope

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Update: 9.08.2019

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China's lunar rover travels 271 meters on moon's far side

China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 271 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to its dormant mode for the lunar night on Wednesday (Beijing time), according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

China's Chang'e-4 probe, launched on Dec. 8, 2018, made the first-ever soft landing on the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3.

A lunar day equals 14 days on Earth, a lunar night the same length. The Chang'e-4 probe switches to dormant mode during the lunar night due to lack of solar power.

During the eighth lunar day of the probe on the moon, the scientific instruments on the lander and rover worked well, and a new batch of scientific detection data were sent to the core research team for analysis.

As a result of the tidal locking effect, the moon's revolution cycle is the same as its rotation cycle, and the same side always faces Earth.

The far side of the moon has unique features, and scientists expect Chang'e-4 could bring breakthrough findings.

The scientific tasks of the Chang'e-4 mission include low-frequency radio astronomical observation, surveying the terrain and landforms, detecting the mineral composition and shallow lunar surface structure and measuring neutron radiation and neutral atoms.

The Chang'e-4 mission embodies China's hope to combine wisdom in space exploration with four payloads developed by the Netherlands, Germany, Sweden and Saudi Arabia.

Quelle: Xinhua 
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Update: 17.08.2019
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China's Chang'e-4 Rover Keeps Snapping Stunning Photos of the Moon's Far Side

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China's Chang'e-4 lander as seen on the moon in a photograph released on July 9.
(Image: © China Lunar Exploration Project)

China's Chang'e-4 mission has completed eight full days of science work on the far side of the moon — and in between the experiments, the lander and rover have sent home some new photographs, too.

The mission touched down in early January, becoming the first robotic mission to land on the far side of the moon. Here, days and nights each last the equivalent of about two weeks on Earth, and the nights are brutally cold.

But for now, the mission seems to be holding up against the harsh conditions. During their seventh workday, which ended on July 9, the two robots completed a range of measurements using neutron detectors, radiation instruments, infrared spectrometers and radio devices.

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A photograph of the Yutu-2 rover's tracks on the moon.

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A photograph of the Yutu-2 rover's tracks on the moon.

 

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A view of the lunar surface from the Chang'e-4 mission's landing site.
(Image credit: China Lunar Exploration Project)

The duo then powered down for a two-week nap to wait out the frigid night before waking up again on July 26 for another workday that ended on Aug. 7. According to the China Lunar Exploration Project, by the end of that eighth workday, the rover had traveled a total of 890 feet (271 meters) across the far side of the moon.

The far side of the moon is quite different from the side we're used to seeing from Earth, and scientists don't understand how those differences arose. They hope the data gathered by the Chang'e-4 lander and Yutu-2 rover will help decipher that mystery

Quelle: SC

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Update: 25.08.2019

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China's Chang'e-4 probe resumes work for ninth lunar day

The lander and rover of the Chang'e-4 probe have resumed work for the ninth lunar day on the far side of the moon after "sleeping" during the extremely cold night.

The lander woke up at 8:10 a.m. Sunday, and the rover, Yutu-2 (Jade Rabbit-2), awoke at 8:42 a.m. Saturday, according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

For the ninth lunar day, the lander's neutron radiation detector and low-frequency radio detector, as well as the rover's infrared imaging spectrometer and other instruments will be restarted to conduct scientific tasks including moon surface observation and composition analysis.

China's Chang'e-4 probe, launched on Dec. 8, 2018, made the first-ever soft landing on the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3.

A lunar day equals 14 days on Earth, and a lunar night is the same length. The Chang'e-4 probe switches to a dormant mode during the lunar night due to the lack of solar power.

As a result of the tidal locking effect, the moon's revolution cycle is the same as its rotation cycle, and the same side always faces Earth.

The scientific tasks of the Chang'e-4 mission include low-frequency radio astronomical observation, surveying the terrain and landforms, detecting the mineral composition and shallow lunar surface structure and measuring neutron radiation and neutral atoms.

The Chang'e-4 mission embodies China's hope to combine human wisdom in space exploration with four payloads developed by the Netherlands, Germany, Sweden and Saudi Arabia.

Quelle: Xinhua

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Update: 10.09.2019

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China's lunar rover travels over 284 meters on moon's far side

China's lunar rover Yutu-2 has driven 284.66 meters on the far side of the moon to conduct scientific exploration on the virgin territory.

Both the lander and the rover of the Chang'e-4 probe switched to its dormant mode for the lunar night on Friday (Beijing time), according to the Lunar Exploration and Space Program Center of the China National Space Administration.

China's Chang'e-4 probe, launched on Dec. 8, 2018, made the first-ever soft landing on the Von Karman Crater in the South Pole-Aitken Basin on the far side of the moon on Jan. 3.

A lunar day equals 14 days on Earth, a lunar night the same length. The Chang'e-4 probe switches to dormant mode during the lunar night due to lack of solar power.

During the ninth lunar day of the probe on the moon, the scientific instruments on the lander and rover worked well, and a new batch of 2.9 GB scientific detection data was sent to the core research team for analysis.

As a result of the tidal locking effect, the moon's revolution cycle is the same as its rotation cycle, and the same side always faces Earth.

The far side of the moon has unique features, and scientists expect Chang'e-4 could bring breakthrough findings.

The scientific tasks of the Chang'e-4 mission include low-frequency radio astronomical observation, surveying the terrain and landforms, detecting the mineral composition and shallow lunar surface structure and measuring neutron radiation and neutral atoms.

The Chang'e-4 mission embodies China's hope to combine wisdom in space exploration with four payloads developed by the Netherlands, Germany, Sweden and Saudi Arabia.

Quelle: Xinhua

 

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