Blogarchiv

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 22:33 Uhr

Astronomie-History - Kosmos 1939: Leuchten die Sternschnuppen in "kaltem" Licht?

.

Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

.

.

KOSMOS

Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Astronomie 

1333 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 19:10 Uhr

Raumfahrt - NASA testet Lebens Nachweis Bohrer an trockensten Ort der Erde

.

Mary Beth Wilhelm (in white cleanroom suit) carefully samples ground-truth material obtained from the 2.2 meter depth science excavation pit, assisted by Jonathan Araya (Univ. de Antofagasta) and watched by ARADS co-investigators Jocelyn DiRuggiero (Johns Hopkins) and the SOLID instrument lead, Victor Parro (Centro de Astrobiologia, Spain).
Credits: NASA
-
In a harsh environment with very little water and intense ultraviolet radiation, most life in the extreme Atacama Desert in Chile exists as microbial colonies underground or inside rocks.
Researchers at NASA hypothesize that the same may be true if life exists on Mars.
The cold and dry conditions on Mars open the possibility that evidence for life may be found below the surface where negative effects of radiation are mitigated, in the form of organic molecules known as biomarkers. But until humans set foot on the Red Planet, obtaining samples from below the surface of Mars will require the ability to identify a location of high probability for current or ancient life, place a drill, and control the operation robotically. 
.
ARADS test on dry salt lake (halite flats), feeding sample from the drill to the Signs of Life Detector (SOLID) instrument (box on right) and the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL) prototype (box on left). WCL is a version of the 2007 Phoenix Mars instrument.
Credits: NASA
.
The Atacama Rover Astrobiology Drilling Studies (ARADS) project has just completed its first deployment after one month of fieldwork in the hyperarid core of the Atacama Desert, the “driest place on Earth.” Despite being considerably warmer than Mars, the extreme dryness the soil chemistry in this region are remarkably similar to that of the Red Planet. This provides scientists with a Mars-like laboratory where they can study the limits of life and test drilling and life-detection technologies that might be sent to Mars in the future.    
“Putting life-detection instruments in a difficult, Mars-analog environment will help us figure out the best ways of looking for past or current life on Mars, if it existed,” said Dr. Brian Glass, a NASA Ames space scientist and the principal investigator of the ARADS project.  “Having both subsurface reach and surface mobility should greatly increase the number of biomarker and life-target sites we can sample in the Atacama,” Glass added.
More than 20 scientists from the United States, Chile, Spain, and France camped together miles from civilization and worked in extremely dry, 100+ degree heat with high winds during the first ARADS field deployment. Their work was primarily at Yungay Station, a mining ghost town at one of the driest places in the Atacama, owned by the University of Antofagasta in Chile. Yungay has been a focal point for astrobiology studies in the last two decades. ARADS field scientists also evaluated two other Atacama sites – Salar Grande, an ancient dried-up lake composed of thick beds of salt, and Maria Elena, a similarly extremely dry region – to be considered along with Yungay as the host location for the future ARADS tests in 2017-19.
During this initial deployment, scientists put several technologies through the paces under harsh and unpredictable field conditions: a Mars-prototype drill; a sample transfer arm; the Signs of Life Detector (SOLID) created by Spain’s Centro de Astrobiologia (CAB); and a prototype version of the Wet Chemistry Laboratory (WCL), which flew on the Phoenix Mars mission in 2007.
Engineers and scientists were successful in accomplishing their primary technology goal of this season—to use the ARADS drill and sample transfer robot arm at Yungay to acquire and feed sample material to the SOLID and WCL instruments under challenging environmental conditions. The in situ analyses of the drilled samples help set a yardstick for interpreting future results from these two instruments, and will be compared to results obtained from the same samples in some of the best laboratories.   
Additionally, researchers from Johns Hopkins University and NASA Ames collected samples for laboratory investigations of the extreme microorganisms living inside salt habitats in the Atacama. These salt habitats could be the last refuge for life in this extremely dry region that is otherwise devoid of plants, animals, and most types of microorganisms. “We are excited to learn as much as we can about these distinctive, resilient microorganisms, and hope that our studies will improve life-detection technology and strategies for Mars,” said Mary Beth Wilhelm, a NASA Ames researcher and member of the ARADS science team.
Over the next four years, the ARADS project will return to the Atacama to demonstrate the feasibility of integrated roving, drilling and life-detection, with the goal of demonstrating the technical feasibility and scientific value of a mission that searches for evidence of life on Mars.
Quelle: NASA

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1502 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 13:00 Uhr

Raumfahrt - JAXA Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace ERG Mission

.

To elucidate high-energy electrons that repeat their generation and disappearance.
Geospace is the region of outer space near the Earth. The radiation belt called the "Van Allen radiation belt" lies within the geospace, and the belt captures a huge volume of highly charged energy particles that exceed mega electron volts. 
This project aims at elucidating how highly charged electrons have been born while they generate and vanish repeatedly along with space storms caused by the disturbance of solar wind caused by space storms, and how space storms are developed.
Mission Profile
Name Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace ERG
Launch Date 2016FY (Scheduled)
Location Uchinoura Space Center (USC)
Launch Vehicle
open new windowEpsilon
Configuration Weight 350kg
Orbit Altitude Perigee: about 300 km, Apogee: about 30,000 km
Inclination 31°
Type of Orbit Elliptical orbit
Period about 538 min.
Satellite bus SPRINT bus
Major Scientific Instruments (Scheduled)
Extremely high-energy electron sensor (XEP-e)
High-energy particle sensor - electron (HEP-e)
etc.
.
---
Toward Van Allen belts with ERG!
  In the early days of space exploration, 1958, the first US satellite Explorer 1 discovered existence of high energy charged particles in geospace by the onboard radiation detector. The observations by subsequent explorers identified that high energy charged particles are distributed in doughnut shape surrounding Earth. This radiative zone is called the Van Allen belts named after the discoverer, Dr. James Van Allen of University of Iowa, US. The Van Allen belts dynamically change their amount of high energy charged particles depending on the solar activity (especially, during geospace storms).
Attachment positions of message plates
  However, a large number of high energy charged particles in the Van Allen belts cause failure in electronic devices mounted on spacecraft and disturb accurate measurement of the charged particles inside the belts, therefore, it was very hard to observe the heart of the Van Allen belts. Consequently, the question, “Why, When, Where, and How the high energy particles are generated and lost,” has been an over a half century standing scientific mystery since the discovery of the Van Allen belts.
  The ERG satellite (ERG: Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace) will challenge to reveal this mystery of the Van Allen belts with the most advanced nine science instruments. Since the Van Allen belts are distributed in wide altitude range, the ERG satellite takes a highly elliptical orbit to make comprehensive observations of high energy charged particles and electromagnetic fields in the Van Allen belts. (The apogee and perigee altitudes are about 30,000 km and 300 km, respectively, and the orbital period is about 9 hours.)
  We would like to take this opportunity to collect your support messages for ERG that is about to leave the Earth toward the exploration to the Van Allen belts. Your messages and names will be printed on the aluminum plates, and these plates are going to be attached on the satellite as a part of the balance weight to commemorate your support to ERG. Now, together with ERG, let's go out to the exploration of the Van Allen belts that are the last frontier in geospace!
February, 2016
Iku Shinohara
Project Manager, ERG Project Team
Institute of Space and Astronautical Science
.
Quelle: JAXA

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1557 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 12:48 Uhr

Science - Gibt es bald biologischen Supercomputer?

.

Building living, breathing supercomputers
-
The substance that provides energy to all the cells in our bodies, Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers. The discovery opens doors to the creation of biological supercomputers that are about the size of a book.
.
Protein molecules travel around the circuit, forced in certain directions in directed ways, a bit like cars and trucks travelling through a city to arrive at desired results.
.
The substance that provides energy to all the cells in our bodies, Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), may also be able to power the next generation of supercomputers. The discovery opens doors to the creation of biological supercomputers that are about the size of a book.  That is what an international team of researchers led by Prof. Nicolau, the Chair of the Department of Bioengineering at McGill, believe. They've published an article on the subject earlier this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), in which they describe a model of a biological computer that they have created that is able to process information very quickly and accurately using parallel networks in the same way that massive electronic super computers do.
Except that the model bio supercomputer they have created is a whole lot smaller than current supercomputers, uses much less energy, and uses proteins present in all living cells to function.
Doodling on the back of an envelope
"We've managed to create a very complex network in a very small area," says Dan Nicolau, Sr. with a laugh. He began working on the idea with his son, Dan Jr., more than a decade ago and was then joined by colleagues from Germany, Sweden and The Netherlands, some 7 years ago. "This started as a back of an envelope idea, after too much rum I think, with drawings of what looked like small worms exploring mazes."
The model bio-supercomputer that the Nicolaus (father and son) and their colleagues have created came about thanks to a combination of geometrical modelling and engineering knowhow (on the nano scale). It is a first step, in showing that this kind of biological supercomputer can actually work.
The circuit the researchers have created looks a bit like a road map of a busy and very organized city as seen from a plane. Just as in a city, cars and trucks of different sizes, powered by motors of different kinds, navigate through channels that have been created for them, consuming the fuel they need to keep moving.
More sustainable computing
But in the case of the biocomputer, the city is a chip measuring about 1.5 cm square in which channels have been etched. Instead of the electrons that are propelled by an electrical charge and move around within a traditional microchip, short strings of proteins (which the researchers call biological agents) travel around the circuit in a controlled way, their movements powered by ATP, the chemical that is, in some ways, the juice of life for everything from plants to politicians.
Because it is run by biological agents, and as a result hardly heats up at all, the model bio-supercomputer that the researchers have developed uses far less energy than standard electronic supercomputers do, making it more sustainable. Traditional supercomputers use so much electricity, that they heat up a lot and then need to be cooled down, often requiring their own power plant to function.
Moving from model to reality
Although the model bio supercomputer was able to very efficiently tackle a complex classical mathematical problem by using parallel computing of the kind used by supercomputers, the researchers recognize that there is still a lot of work ahead to move from the model they have created to a full-scale functional computer.
"Now that this model exists as a way of successfully dealing with a single problem, there are going to be many others who will follow up and try to push it further, using different biological agents, for example," says Nicolau. "It's hard to say how soon it will be before we see a full scale bio super-computer. One option for dealing with larger and more complex problems may be to combine our device with a conventional computer to form a hybrid device. Right now we're working on a variety of ways to push the research further."
What was once the stuff of science fiction, is now just science.
Story Source:
The above post is reprinted from materials provided by McGill University. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.
Journal Reference:
Dan V. Nicolau, Mercy Lard, Till Korten, Falco C. M. J. M. van Delft, Malin Persson, Elina Bengtsson, Alf Månsson, Stefan Diez, Heiner Linke, Dan V. Nicolau. Parallel computation with molecular-motor-propelled agents in nanofabricated networks. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2016; 201510825 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1510825113
Quelle: SD

Tags: Science 

1434 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 11:33 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Mars One veröffentlicht Buch über die menschlichen Aspekte der Erforschung des Mars

.

Mars One Roadmap for 2017:Selected candidates enter full-time training
Groups selected from the first batch of applicants will train together until the launch in 2026. The group's ability to deal with prolonged periods of time while sequestered in a remote location will be the most important part of their training. Thus, they will learn how to to repair components of the habitat and rover, train in medical procedures, and learn to grow food in the habitat.
Every group spends several months of each training year in the analog outpost to prepare for its mission to Mars. The first outpost simulation location, a Mars-like terrain that is relatively easy to reach, will be chosen. A second training outpost will be located at a more remote environment like the Arctic desert.
-
Mars One releases book about the human aspects of Mars exploration
Amersfoort, 23 February 2016 - You may not be able to go to Mars yourself, but thanks to Mars One’s latest book, everyone can follow along as the first potential human settlers on Mars prepare for their mission. With Mars One: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure, readers can step inside the experience of these astronaut pioneers as they live out the dreams of millions.
“We are very excited about this book because it allows us to share viewpoints on some of the most intriguing questions being asked about the mission.” said Bas Lansdorp, CEO and co-founder of Mars One.
In 2012, Mars One announced intentions to establish a permanent human settlement on Mars; they launched their astronaut selection program in 2013 and received thousands of applications. Edited by Norbert Kraft, MD, Mars One’s Chief Medical Officer and head of the crew selection and training committee, as well as committee members James R. Kass, PhD, and Raye Kass, PhD, Mars One: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure provides a behind-the-scenes look at the process and criteria used to choose candidates, as well as fascinating details about their future lives on Mars.
The foreword is written by Prof. Dr. Gerard ‘t Hooft, Nobel-Prize winning theoretical physicist. Other contributors include Dr. Mason Peck, Prof. Thais Russomano, and Jamie Guined, M.Ed., MBA.
Within Mars One: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure, readers will discover:
What essential training and skills will the Mars One astronauts need to develop to survive on Mars?
What combination of genders and ages make for the most effective four-person crew? How do individual cultural backgrounds factor in?
Will settlers be able to communicate with Earth?
What can the Mars One mission learn from past periods of human exploration?
What are the complexities of a group of four, and ultimately hundreds, operating with complete independence from human societies on Earth?
What are the psychological ramifications of knowing your actions are being watched by millions of people? What does Mars One hope watching the process will mean for viewers at home?
The challenges of landing and colonizing Mars may seem daunting, but that has been true for ever leap forward. Mars One’s mission is the next giant leap for mankind, and with Mars One: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure, people everywhere can look behind the curtains of Mars One’s astronaut selection process.
About the Authors               
Norbert Kraft, MD, received “The NASA Group Achievement Award 2013,” one of the most prestigious awards a group can receive, presented to selected groups who have distinguished themselves by making outstanding contributions to the NASA mission. In 2010, Kraft received the 2010 Award for “Outstanding Accomplishments in the Psychological and Psychiatric Aspects of Aerospace Medicine.”
He has over 20 years of experience in aviation and aerospace research and development. His primary area of expertise is developing physiological and psychological countermeasures to combat the negative effects of long-duration spaceflight. Dr. Kraft’s experiences span Europe, Asia, and the United States, where he has worked for several international space agencies, including the Russian Space Agency and the Japanese Space Agency. Dr. Kraft is an author of over 40 papers in the field of aerospace medicine, including a seminal paper on intercultural crew issues in long-duration spaceflight. He has an M.D. from University of Vienna, Austria, and is a Fellow of the Aerospace Medical Association.
Dr. James R. Kass has been working in the field of human spaceflight for more than 30 years. He was an investigator on the first Spacelab mission in the early 80s in the field of neurophysiology. In the decade following, he gained industrial experience at several aerospace companies in Germany, before joining the European Space Agency at its research and technology centre, ESTEC, in the Netherlands.
Dr. Kass has trained astronauts and worked on the ground operations teams for several Spacelab / Space Shuttle and MIR missions (including the tragic STS-107), with crews from Russia, USA, Middle and Far East, and several European countries. He has also worked with cosmonauts of the former Salyut space station and astronauts of the first US space station, Skylab. He has participated as scientist and reviewer in several isolation experiments investigating psychology of long-duration isolation, as one will certainly encounter on Mars.
Dr. Raye Kass, Professor of Applied Human Sciences at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada, currently spearheads group theory courses at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. Dr. Kass has been highlighted frequently by both national and international press agencies for both her space sciences and group theory research. Dr. Kass has also been invited to be involved in numer- ous space research projects in conjunction with the Canadian Space Agency and NASA, including the Psychological Experiment/Training Programme for the CAPSULS Mission held in Canada, the SFINCCS mission held in Russia, and the NSBRI (National Space Biomedical Research Institute) Ground-based Research Project with the NASA Ames Research Centre in the USA.                  
Dr. Kass is the author of Theories of Small Group Development, as well as the coauthor of three other books on group theory.
About Mars One
Mars One is a not for profit foundation with the goal of establishing a permanent human settlement on Mars. To prepare for this settlement the first unmanned mission is scheduled to depart in 2020. Crews will depart for their one-way journey to Mars starting in 2026; subsequent crews will depart every 26 months after the initial crew has left for Mars. Mars One is a global initiative aiming to make this everyone's mission to Mars, including yours. Join Mars One’s efforts to enable the next giant leap for mankind.
For more information about Mars One, please visit www.mars-one.com.
Book Details
Title: Mars One: Humanity’s Next Great Adventure
Subtitle: Inside the First Human Settlement on Mars
Authors: Norbert Kraft, MD; Dr. James R. Kass; Dr. Raye Kass
Publisher: BenBella Books, Inc.
Distributed by Perseus Distribution
Publication Date: February 23, 2016
ISBN: 978-1-940363-83-7
eISBN: 978-1-940363-93-6
Price: $16.95 US | $21.50 CAN
Format: Trade Paper
Page Count: 240

Tags: Raumfahrt 

1432 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 11:15 Uhr

Astronomie - Kalter Staub im Universum ATLASGAL-Kartierung der südlichen Milchstraße vollendet

.

26.02.2016

This part image of the Milky Way has been released to mark the completion of the APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy (ATLASGAL). The APEX telescope in Chile has mapped the full area of the Galactic Plane visible from the southern hemisphere for the first time at submillimeter wavelengths -- between infrared light and radio waves -- and in finer detail than recent space-based surveys. The APEX data, at a wavelength of 0.87 millimeters, shows up in red and the background blue image was imaged at shorter infrared wavelengths by the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope as part of the GLIMPSE survey. The fainter extended red structures come from complementary observations made by ESA's Planck satellite.

.

APEX, the Atacama Pathfinder EXperiment telescope, is located at 5100 metres above sea level on the Chajnantor Plateau in Chile's Atacama region. The ATLASGAL survey took advantage of the unique characteristics of the telescope to provide a detailed view of the distribution of cold dense gas along the plane of the Milky Way galaxy [1]. The new image includes most of the regions of star formation in the southern Milky Way [2].
The new ATLASGAL maps cover an area of sky 140 degrees long and 3 degrees wide, more than four times larger than the first ATLASGAL release [3]. The new maps are also of higher quality, as some areas were re-observed to obtain a more uniform data quality over the whole survey area.
The ATLASGAL survey is the single most successful APEX large programme with nearly 70 associated science papers already published, and its legacy will expand much further with all the reduced data products now available to the full astronomical community [4].
At the heart of APEX are its sensitive instruments. One of these, LABOCA (the LArge BOlometer Camera) was used for the ATLASGAL survey. LABOCA measures incoming radiation by registering the tiny rise in temperature it causes on its detectors and can detect emission from the cold dark dust bands obscuring the stellar light.
The new release of ATLASGAL complements observations from ESA's Planck satellite [5]. The combination of the Planck and APEX data allowed astronomers to detect emission spread over a larger area of sky and to estimate from it the fraction of dense gas in the inner Galaxy. The ATLASGAL data were also used to create a complete census of cold and massive clouds where new generations of stars are forming.
"ATLASGAL provides exciting insights into where the next generationof high-mass stars and clusters form. By combining these with observations from Planck, we can now obtain a link to the large-scale structures of giant molecular clouds," remarks Timea Csengeri from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (MPIfR), Bonn, Germany, who led the work of combining the APEX and Planck data.
The APEX telescope recently celebrated ten years of successful research on the cold Universe. It plays an important role not only as pathfinder, but also as a complementary facility to ALMA, the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array, which is also located on the Chajnantor Plateau. APEX is based on a prototype antenna constructed for the ALMA project, and it has found many targets that ALMA can study in great detail.
Leonardo Testi from ESO, who is a member of the ATLASGAL team and the European Project Scientist for the ALMA project, concludes: "ATLASGAL has allowed us to have a new and transformational look at the dense interstellar medium of our own galaxy, the Milky Way. The new release of the full survey opens up the possibility to mine this marvellous dataset for new discoveries. Many teams of scientists are already using the ATLASGAL data to plan for detailed ALMA follow-up."
Notes
[1] The map was constructed from individual APEX observations of radiation with a wavelength of 870 µm (0.87 millimetres).
[2] The northern part of the Milky Way had already been mapped by the James Clerk Maxwell Telescope and other telescopes, but the southern sky is particularly important as it includes the Galactic Centre, and because it is accessible for detailed follow-up observations with ALMA.
[3] The first data release covered an area of approximately 95 square degrees, a very long and narrow strip along the Galactic Plane two degrees wide and over 40 degrees long. The final maps now cover 420 square degrees, more than four times larger.
[4] The data products are available through the ESO archive.
[5] The Planck data coverhe full sky, but with poor spatial resolution. ATLASGAL covers only the Galactic plane, but with high angular resolution. Combining both provides excellent spatial dynamic range.
Quelle: SD
-
Update: 28.02.2016
.
Kalter Staub im Universum
ATLASGAL-Kartierung der südlichen Milchstraße vollendet
-
Eine Reihe von spektakulären Bildern der Milchstraße sind anlässlich der Vollendung des “APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy” (ATLASGAL) veröffentlicht worden. Das APEX-Teleskop in Chile wird in Zusammenarbeit zwischen dem Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), dem Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) in Schweden und der Europäischen Südsternwarte (ESO) betrieben. Im Rahmen des Projekts wurde der komplette von der Südhalbkugel aus zugängliche Bereich der Milchstraßenebene zum ersten Mal in Submillimeterwellenlängen (zwischen Infrarot- und Radiobereich des elektromagnetischen Spektrums) bei hoher Auflösung erfasst. Dadurch werden Details und Strukturen sichtbar, die in Kartierungen mit kleineren Weltraumteleskopen im gleichen Wellenlängenbereich nicht erfasst wurden. Das 12m-APEX-Teleskop spielt eine Vorreiterrolle bei der Untersuchung des kalten Universums, von kosmischen Gas- und Staubwolken mit Temperaturen von nur einigen 10 Grad über dem absoluten Nullpunkt.
.
Abbildungen von drei unterschiedlichen Bereichen der Milchstraße, basierend auf hochaufgelösten Beobachtungen mit der APEX-LABOCA-Kamera in Verbindung mit Daten vom Planck-Satelliten der ESA. Oben: 6 x 3 Grad- Feld zentriert auf das Galaktische Zentrum in Richtung des Sternbilds „Schütze“. Das helle Objekt direkt links vom Zentrum des Bildes ist Sgr B2. Unten links: Himmelsregion in Richtung des Sternbilds “Skorpion”mit NGC 6334 als hellster Quelle (vgl. überlappendes Feld in Abb. 2). Unten rechts: Himmelsregion in Richtung des Sternbilds „Schild“.
.
APEX, das „Atacama Pathfinder Experiment”, ist ein Teleskop von 12 m Durchmesser in 5100 m Höhe auf der Chajnantor-Hochebene in der chilenischen Atacamawüste. Der mit diesem Teleskop erstellte „APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy“ (ATLASGAL) profitiert von den einmaligen Eigenschaften dieses Teleskops und ermöglicht dadurch ein detailliertes Bild der Verteilung von dichtem kalten Gas entlang der Ebene der Milchstraße. Tatsächlich umfasst die komplette ATLASGAL-Kartierung den überwiegenden Teil der Sternentstehungsgebiete in unserer Milchstraße.
Die Karten von ATLASGAL decken insgesamt einen 140 Grad langen und 3 Grad breiten Streifen am Himmel ab. Das Projekt ist das bis dato erfolgreichste Beobachtungsprogramm mit dem APEX-Teleskop, mit mehr als 69 auf  ATLASGAL basierenden wissenschaftlichen Veröffentlichungen. Da nun die reduzierten Daten und Datenprodukte für die komplette Astronomische Gemeinschaft zur Verfügung stehen,  ist zu erwarten, dass diese Zahl alsbald kräftig ansteigen wird.     
Das Herzstück von APEX bilden seine exzellenten Empfangssysteme. Einer dieser Empfänger, LABOCA (die “LArge BOlometer Camera”), mit dem nach wie vor der größten Detektor seiner Art auf der Südhalbkugel, wurde für die ATLASGAL-Messungen eingesetzt. LABOCA wurde am Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR) in Bonn gebaut und misst die eintreffende Strahlung in Submillimeter-Wellenlängen über einen dadurch verursachten winzigen Temperaturanstieg. Dadurch wird es möglich, die Strahlung von dunklen Staubregionen zu erfassen, die das Licht von dahinterliegenden Sternen komplett absorbieren.
“Wenn wir die ATLASGAL-Messungen mit ihrer hohen Winkelauflösung mit den Daten vom Planck-Weltraumobservatorium der ESA verknüpfen, erhalten wir daraus einen Datensatz von Weltraumqualität, aber mit einer 20fach höheren Auflösung”, sagt Axel Weiß vom MPIfR, der für die Verbindung beider Datensätze verantwortlich zeichnete. Dadurch wird es den Astronomen nun möglich, Submillimeterstrahlung nachzuweisen, die sich über einen großen Bereich am Himmel verteilt und so den Gesamtanteil von dichtem Gas im inneren Bereich der Milchstraße zu erfassen. Die ATLASGAL-Daten wurden außerdem dafür verwendet, kalte und massereiche Wolken, in denen eine neue Generation von Sternen heranwächst, möglichst komplett statistisch zu erfassen. 
„ATLASGAL bringt uns aufregende neue Erkenntnisse darüber, wo sich die nächste Generation von massereichen Sternen und Sternhaufen bildet. Durch die Verknüpfung mit den Planck-Daten erhalten wir einen Zugang zu den großskaligen Strukturen der riesigen Molekülwolken, in denen das stattfindet“, bemerkt Timea Csengeri, ebenfalls vom MPIfR, die Erstautorin der Veröffentlichung über die Verteilung von kaltem Staub in der Milchstraße auf der Basis der kombinierten ATLASGAL- und Planck-Daten.  
Am APEX-Teleskop wurden erst kürzlich die ersten 10 Jahre erfolgreicher Forschung über das kalte Universum gefeiert. Das Teleskop spielt dabei eine wichtige Rolle nicht nur als Pfadfinder, sondern auch als komplementäres Instrument zu ALMA, dem „Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array“, das sich in unmittelbarer Nachbarschaft ebenfalls auf der Chanjantor-Hochebene in Chile befindet. Mit APEX , das ursprünglich auf einer Prototyp-Antenne für ALMA basiert, wurden bereits eine Menge neuer Himmelsobjekte aufgespürt, die anschließend mit Hilfe von ALMA sehr detailliert untersucht werden konnten. 
„ATLASGAL ermöglicht uns einen neuen und geänderten Blick in das dichte interstellare Medium in unserer Milchstraße“, sagt Leonardo Testi von der ESO, Mitglied im ATLASGAL-Forschungsteam und europäischer Projektwissenschaftler für ALMA. „Die jetzt erfolgte Veröffentlichung des kompletten Datensatzes eröffnet eine exzellente Möglichkeit für neue Entdeckungen. Viele Wissenschaftlerteams nutzen bereits die ATLASGAL-Daten um damit detaillierte Nachfolgebeobachtungen mit ALMA zu konzipieren.“ 
„Die moderne Astronomie geht immer von einem Multiwellenlängen-Ansatz aus. ATLASGAL fügt einen Blick aufs kalte Universum hinzu, und damit direkt hinein in die Wiegen junger Sterne“, schließt Karl Menten vom MPIfR, der Leiter des APEX-Projekts.
.
Bild der Milchstraße in Richtung des Sternbilds “Skorpion” mit  den Himmelsobjekten NGC 6334 („Katzenpfotennebel“, oben links) und RCW 120 (oben rechts). Die APEX-Daten bei einer Wellenlänge von 0,87 mm sind in Rot dargestellt, die ausgedehnten Strukturen in Orange basieren auf Messungen mit dem Planck-Satelliten der ESA. Der blaue Hintergrund resultiert von Messungen bei kürzeren Infrarotwellenlängen mit dem Spitzer-Teleskop der NASA im Rahmen der GLIMPSE-Kartierung.
.
APEX, das “Atacama Pathfinder Experiment”, ist ein Radioteleskop für den Submillimeter-Wellenlängenbereich, das in Zusammenarbeit vom Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), dem Onsala Space Observatory (OSO) und der Europäischen Südsternwarte (ESO) betrieben wird. Es wurde konstruiert auf der Grundlage einer modifizierten ALMA-Prototyp-Antenne und steht in 5100 Meter Höhe auf der Chajnantor-Ebene in der chilenischen Atacamawüste. Gebaut wurde das Teleskop von VERTEX-Antennentechnik in Duisburg. Der Betrieb von APEX obliegt der Europäischen Südsternwarte.
ATLASGAL , der “APEX Telescope Large Area Survey of the Galaxy”, erfolgt in Zusammenarbeit zwischen dem Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie (MPIfR), dem Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA), der ESO, und der University of Chile.
ALMA, das “Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array”, wird gemeinsam von der ESO, der amerikanischen National Science Foundation (NSF) und den National Institutes of Natural Sciences (NINS) in Japan in Zusammenarbeit mit dem chilenischen Staat betrieben. ALMA wird über die ESO im Auftrag der Mitgliedsstaaten finanziert, weiterhin von der NSF in Zusammenarbeit mit dem National Research Council of Canada (NRC) und dem National Science Council of Taiwan (NSC) sowie von der NINS in Zusammenarbeit mit der Academia Sinica (AS) in Taiwan und dem Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute (KASI).
Quelle: Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn
 

Tags: Astronomie 

1585 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 11:00 Uhr

Astronomie - Dänemark Ejby Meteoriten-Stücke (6.02.2016) in Kopenhagen-Ausstellung

.

Über unseren Forschungskollegen Ole Henningsen aus Dänemark, bekamen wir heute  schöne Fotos von Elby-Meteoriten-Niedergang mit folgenden Zeilen:

.

Ich wollte am 25. Februar einige Stücke des Ejby-Meteoriten  in Kopenhagen gerne persönlich sehen.
Und war mit post.doc. Daniel Wielandt im Ausstellungsraum (Siehe Foto).
Einige Minuten später bekam ich ein Anruf von ihm als ich schon wieder weg war, dass nun ein Extra Stück eingelifert wurde.
Und ich fuhr im Auto zurück und sprach mit Henning Haack und dem Finder.
-
Fundort: Auch Ejby. Ca. 500 gr.
.
post.doc. Daniel Wielandt im Ausstellungsraum
.
Junger Mann (Ole Henningsen/SUFOI) mit "alten"Ejby Meteoriten-Stück
.
Fundort: Auch Ejby. Ca. 500 gr.
Quelle: Ole Hennningsen/SUFOI
 

Tags: Astronomie 

1281 Views

Sonntag, 28. Februar 2016 - 00:53 Uhr

Astronomie - Feuerkugel über Odenwald

.

Gegen 0.11 MEZ am frühen Sonntagmorgen von 28.02.2016 Feuerkugel für 2-3 Sekunden links von abnehmenden Mond mit abschließender Nachglühspur beobachten können während der Autofahrt zwischen Höllerbach und Hummetroth bei Höchst im Odenwald.

.

Gab es noch weitere Zeugen?

CENAP-Mannheim


Tags: Astronomie 

1681 Views

Samstag, 27. Februar 2016 - 14:30 Uhr

Astronomie-History - Kosmos 1939: Mars-Opposition Juli 1939 - Was wissen wir eigentlich vom Mars?

.

Aus dem CENAP-Archiv:

.

.

.

.

KOSMOS

Quelle: CENAP-Archiv


Tags: Astronomie 

1208 Views

Samstag, 27. Februar 2016 - 14:20 Uhr

UFO-Forschung - Wenn Luftwaffen-Jet´s zu UFO-Alarm werden...

.

Geheimnis am Nachthimmel

vom 24. Februar 2016
Aus der Redaktion des Prignitzers

Leser berichten von vier Flugkörpern und grellem Licht. Behörden können das Phänomen nicht erklären.

Nein, die Marsmännchen werden es gewiss nicht gewesen sein, was unsere Leserin am Dienstagabend im Raum Kletzke am Nachthimmel entdeckt hatte. Was es war, ist aber auch nach einem Tag Recherche unserer Redaktion noch offen. Mit anderen Worten: Noch sind es Ufos – unbekannte Flugobjekte.
Unsere Leserin hatte in jedem Fall einen aufregenden Dienstagabend hinter sich, als sie sich gestern früh in der Redaktion meldet. In oder noch besser über ihrem Ort habe sich gestern etwas Unheimliches abgespielt, sagt sie. „Es war kurz vor 8 Uhr abends, ich wollte es mir auf der Couch gerade gemütlich machen, da waren mit einem Mal ungewöhnliche Geräusche zu hören.“ Am Himmel entdeckte sie Flugkörper. „Es sah aus, als wenn sie direkt über unserem Ort immer im Kreis flogen.“
Was war es? Mit ihren beiden Cousinen, die die Flugkörper auch gesichtet haben, habe sie noch ’rum geulkt, ob es sich wohl um Ufos handele, erzählt sie. Aber nein, es könnten Flugzeuge oder noch eher Hubschrauber gewesen sein, meint sie. „Auf jeden Fall hatten wir ein ungutes Gefühl“, fährt sie fort.
Dazu hat mit Sicherheit auch beigetragen, dass „unter den Flugkörpern eine Art Ring aus grellem Licht zu sehen war“. „Es hat mich an Zenonlicht am Auto erinnert, nur riesiger. Aber es war kein Lichtkegel nach unten gerichtet“, schildert sie das Erlebte, „das irgendwie unheimlich war“.
Was oder wer ist dort geflogen? Auch unsere Redaktion muss die Antwort vorerst schuldig bleiben. Die Pressesprecherin der Polizeidirektion Nord in Neuruppin, Dörte Röhrs sagt: „Es gab kein polizeiliches Vorkommnis, für das Hubschrauber im Einsatz waren.“ Auch der Raub in einem Getränkemarkt in Neustadt (Ostprignitz/Ruppin) am Dienstagabend stehe damit nicht im Zusammenhang. Die Fliegerstaffel der Bundespolizei habe am Dienstag keine Übungen in der Prignitz absolviert, sagt eine Sprecherin des Bundespolizei-Präsidiums Berlin auf Anfrage. Der Behörde seien auch keine anderen entsprechenden Aktivitäten bekannt.
Die Gemeinsame Obere Luftfahrtbehörde Berlin-Brandenburg weiß ebenfalls keine Antwort. Zivile Flüge in diesem Bereich seien nicht gemeldet worden, sagt die Pressesprecherin des Brandenburger Landesamtes für Bauen und Verkehr, Birgit Schuster. Daher sei von militärischen Aktivitäten auszugehen.
Doch auch der erste Anruf bei der Bundeswehr bringt keine Aufklärung. Das sächsische Lufttransportgeschwader 64 fliege zwar Übungen mit vier Maschinen, aber nicht im Raum Prignitz, teilte ein Sprecher mit.
Dass sich unsere Leserin nicht geirrt hat, zeigen Reaktionen auf Facebook. Ironisch fragten wir nach Marsmännchen und baten Leser, ähnliche Sichtungen zu posten. Das taten sie: Vier Flugzeuge bei Bendelin gesichtet, schreibt jemand. Mehrere bestätigen, dass sie ebenfalls vier Flugzeuge gesehen hätten.
Eine Leserin vermutet Drohnen, da sie keine Geräusche gehört habe. Übereinstimmend wird von grellen Lichtern berichtet. Ein anderer tippt auf Helikopter. Die habe er in Bad Wilsnack gesehen. Das Rätselraten geht also weiter und bis zur Antwort bleiben es Unbekannte Flugobjekte. 
---

Kampfjets aus Laage trainieren neue Taktik

 

vom 25. Februar 2016
Aus der Redaktion des Prignitzers

Abfangübungen am nächtlichen Himmel über der Prignitz, Piloten der Bundeswehr nehmen an einem Spezialtraining teil

Das Rätsel ist gelöst, die Prignitzer UFOs identifiziert: Kampfjets fliegen am Nachthimmel über der Prignitz. Das bestätigt Oberstleutnant Matthias Ackermann unserer Zeitung. Im Einsatz ist das Taktische Luftwaffengeschwader 73 „Steinhoff“ aus Laage, Mecklenburg-Vorpommern.
:
Geheimnis am Nachthimmel
Am Mittwoch hatte uns eine Leserin aus Kletzke angerufen. Sie hatte Dienstagabend mehrere Flugobjekte gesehen, die aber nicht genau zu erkennen waren. Ebenfalls sprach sie von einem grellen Licht. Auf unserer Facebookseite bestätigten viele Leser diese Sichtungen auch im Raum Bad Wilsnack, Havelberg und Pritzwalk. Siegfried Appel aus Quitzöbel rief gestern an. Er hatte gesehen, wie zwei Flugkörper zwei andere verfolgten. Der entscheidende Hinweis auf Facebook erreichte uns am späten Mittwochabend.
„Das sind unsere Maschinen gewesen“, sagt Ackermann, den wir gestern in der Pressestelle erreichten. Das Geschwader führt in dieser Woche einen Kurs für Piloten des Eurofighters durch. An diesem nehmen zehn bereits erfahrene Piloten teil. „Es geht um eine Weiterbildung, in der spezielle taktische Verfahren trainiert werden“, erklärt der Presseoffizier.
Ebenfalls beteiligt waren an jenem Abend zwei Lear-Jets. Diese Spezialflugzeuge spielten die feindlichen Eindringlinge. Kampfjets sollten sie abfangen. Das helle Licht dürften zusätzliche Signalleuchten gewesen sein.
Es ist der erste Kurs dieser Art für Piloten der Bundeswehr, so Matthias Ackermann. Das Training endet heute, soll künftig jährlich stattfinden. Die Übungen müssen keiner Luftfahrtbehörde angezeigt werden. Sie finden in einem Luftraum statt, der dem Militär offiziell zur Verfügung stehe. Dieser erstreckt sich über Mecklenburg, Nord- und Ostsee, Hamburg bis an den nördlichen und südlichen Rand von Berlin, erklärt Ackermann.
Es gelten die Luftfahrtregeln mit denen alle Verkehrspiloten vertraut seien. Außerdem werden die Flüge durch eine zivile Stelle von Bremen aus überwacht.
Learjets sind zweistrahlige Flugzeuge, die häufig für Geschäftsreisen genutzt werden. Die an der Übung beteiligten Maschinen stammen von der Gesellschaft für Flugzieldarstellung (GFD), bestätigt Matthias Ackermann. Die GFD ist ein Trainingspartner der Bundeswehr. Sie hat ihren Sitz auf dem NATO-Flugplatz Hohn bei Rendsburg.
Nach eigenen Angaben verfügt sie über eine Flotte von 14 Learjets. Sie kommen in der Ausbildung für die Waffensysteme von Heer, Luftwaffe und Marine zum Einsatz, heißt es auf der Homepage. 
Quelle: SVZ



 


Tags: UFO-Forschung 

1523 Views


Weitere 10 Nachrichten nachladen...