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Sonntag, 5. Januar 2014 - 22:23 Uhr

Astronomie - Ein koronaler Massenauswurf (CME) vom 4.Januar könnte die Erde treffen

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CME, POSSIBLY INCOMING: A coronal mass ejection (CME) might be heading for Earth. The cloud blasted away from the sun during the late hours of Jan 4th following a long-duration M4-class solar flare from big sunspot AR1944. SOHO (the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) recorded the explosion:
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The assymetric CME could deliver a glancing blow to Earth's magnetic field on January 7th, possibly sparking G1-class geomagnetic storms. NOAA analysts are still processing the CME imagery for a more precise forecast.
Quelle: Spaceweather

Tags: CME 

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Sonntag, 5. Januar 2014 - 22:00 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Erfolgreicher ISRO Start von GSAT-14 mit GSLV-D5 - Update

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18.08.2013

ISRO rocket launch Monday with indigenous cryogenic engine

In a month marked by key advances in indigenously-developed technology, 's space agency will also test its mettle with a crucial rocket, powered by a cryogenic engine built in the country, slated to blast off Monday.

The countdown for the flight of the heavy geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle (GSLV) is set to begin Sunday evening, Indian space agency officials said.

According to Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO), the 29 hour countdown would start at 11.50 a.m. Sunday and the rocket is expected to blast off at 4.50 p.m. Monday from India's rocket port Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, around 80 km from here.

This month has already seen key advances.

As the country celebrated its 67th Independence Day, the month saw activation of the indigenously built small reactor to power submarine INS Arihant, the launch of the indigenously-built aircraft carrier INS Vikrant while a unit of Kudankulam Nuclear Power Project (KNPP) is expected to be connected to the grid month end.

One event that created a shadow was the loss of Indian naval submarine INS Sindhurakshak.

Now eyes are on the ISRO to see whether the GSLV, powered by its own crucial cryogenic engine would successfully deliver its baby-communication satellite - the 1,982 kg GSAT-14 - into outer space.

"After two GSLV failures, ISRO has to prove itself at the earliest possible. There is always a pressure on that count," a senior ISRO official, who did not want to be named, told IANS.

This will be the first mission of GSLV during the last three years after two such rockets failed in 2010.

One of the GSLV rockets flew with Indian cryogenic engine and the other one with a Russian engine.

The GSLV is a three stage/engine rocket. The first stage is fired with solid fuel, the second is the liquid fuel and the third is the cryogenic engine.

The successful flight of this rocket is crucial for India as it will be the first step towards building rockets that can carry heavier payloads, up to four tons.

According to ISRO, several design changes have been incorporated in the Monday's rocket for a safe flight.

Design changes were made in the lower shroud/cover that protect the cryogenic engine during the atmospheric flight; wire tunnel of the cryogenic stage to withstand larger forces during the flight; and the revised aerodynamic characterisation of the entire rocket.

Others included video imaging of lower shroud movement during various flight phases; fuel booster in cryogenic engine; and ignition sequence of the cryogenic engine.

ISRO said indigenisation of many critical systems including liquid hydrogen propellant acquisition system (to prevent possibility of outside contamination) was achieved.

It is going to be a tense 17 minutes for the ISRO scientists Monday after the 49.13 metre tall rocket weighing 414.75 ton blasts off at 4.50 p.m. till the GSLV rocket safely delivers GSAT-14 to augment the Indian transponder - receivers and transmitters of signals - capacity.

ISRO is planning to launch an upgraded version of GSLV Mark III rocket next year with a dummy payload. The design payload capacity of GSLV Mark III is four tons.

Meanwhile an ISRO official said the fuelling of the three stage/engine GSLV rocket's four strap-on motors and the second stage with liquid fuel will be completed by Aug 19 morning while the first stage core engine is powered by solid fuel.

The process of fuelling the cryogenic engine will begin around 10 hours prior to the launch.

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GSLV-D5 at the Second Launch Pad

Quelle: ISRO

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Indian space science is waiting at the threshold of a new phase of mega satellite launches and exploration as the countdown for the GSLV-D5 rocket launch began at 11.50am on Sunday. Twenty-nine hours later, at 4.50pm on Monday, the rocket carrying telecommunication satellite GSAT-14 will lift off from Sriharikota, 100km north of Chennai.

GSAT-14, which weighs 1,982kg, will be used for telecast and telecommunication.

What makes the launch crucial for the nation is the use of an indigenous cryogenic engine as the upper stage. The first attempt to use an indigenous cryogenic engine on April 15, 2010 to power GSLV-D3 was a failure. With only one more Russian cryogenic engine left in the Isro arsenal, success of the indigenous technology using oxygen and hydrogen in extreme low temperatures as the fuel will propel several big ticket future missions including a manned project to space.

Isro senior scientists led by chairman K Radhakrishnan are monitoring GSLV-D5, whose strap-boosters started getting fuelled soon after the countdown. Liquid propellants are being filled into the second stage. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, which fuel the cryogenic engine will be filled around 9am on Monday. Scientists at the Satish Dhawan Space Centre told TOI that the rocket's health and weather conditions were fine.

India needs cryogenic engines to launch GSLVs that can carry payloads weighing more than three tonnes, which hold the key to future of telecommunication and space exploration. GSLV-D5 weighs 414 tonnes.

Since 1994, India has had 23 consecutive successes with the Polar Sateliite Launch Vehicles (PSLVs), an improvised version of which was used for Chandrayaan-1 in August 2009. However, PSLVs can carry only payloads weighing up to 1.5 tonnes to a geosynchronous transfer orbit (a highly elliptical orbit with the nearest point to earch about 200km and the farthest 42,00km) , and up to 3.5 tonnes to a low earth orbit of about 200km from earth. GSLV can carry payloads weighing 2.5 tonnes to a geosynchronous transfer orbit, and up to 5 tonnes to a low earth orbit.

Quelle: The Times of India

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UPDATE: 21.45 MESZ

Quelle: ISRO

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Update: 19.08.2013

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The 29-hour countdown for the launch of indigenously developed geo-synchronous satellite launch vehicle D5 (GSLV-D5), along with communication satellite GSAT-14, scheduled to blast-off on Monday at Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SHAR) in Sriharikota is progressing smoothly.

“The countdown which started at 11:50 am is progressing well and the process of filling liquid propellant to the rocket is in progress,” a senior official from the Indian Space Research Organisation (Isro) told Deccan Herald on Sunday.

The official said that liquid propellants are being filled into the second stage. Liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, which fuel the cryogenic engine, will be filled around 9 am on Monday, he added. Though the Met department has predicted heavy rain over the coastal region in the next 24 hours due to upper air cyclonic circulation over the Bay of Bengal, Isro officials were confident that the launch would not be affected.

“The rain does not matter as the vehicle is fully rain-proof,” the official said.


The mission assumes significance as the indigenously developed cryogenic upper stage (CUS) will be flight tested for the second time.

Quelle: Deccan Herald

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After years of effort and back-to-back failures, today’s GSLV launch is crucial to ISRO’s quest for an indigenous cryogenic engine

Once again, a Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) is on the launch pad at Sriharikota. This launch will be crucial — after two successive failures of the rocket, the Indian Space Research Organisation can ill afford one more troubled flight. Moreover, the space agency needs to demonstrate that, after 20 years of effort, it has now mastered cryogenic technology.

The GSLV retains the first two stages of its predecessor, the Polar Satellite Launch Vehicle (PSLV). In order to carry heavier satellites than the latter, the third stage of the GSLV uses cryogenic propulsion. Running on liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, a cryogenic engine offers greater energy efficiency than those that use other propellants. The improved efficiency means that the upper stage can carry less propellant, with the weight saved translating directly into more payload.

ISRO tried to purchase cryogenic technology from what was then the Soviet Union, but the deal that was signed in 1991 ran into trouble after the U.S. imposed sanctions. Russia, which inherited the deal after the breakup of the Soviet Union, backed out of providing the technology but agreed to supply seven flight-worthy stages for the GSLV. (For more details see “The long road to cryogenic technology,” The Hindu, April 15, 2010).

Left with no option, ISRO began the Cryogenic Upper Stage Project in April 1994 for developing an indigenous version of the Russian cryogenic engine and stage. While this technology development was in progress, it could fly the GSLV with Russian-made stages.

The GSLV, equipped with a Russian cryogenic stage, first flew in 2001. However, unlike the PSLV, which shook off the failure of its first launch and went on to notch up 23 consecutive successes, the GSLV has been trouble prone. In its seven flights so far, three were outright failures and another two suffered serious problems.

In April 2010, the GSLV flew for the first time with an indigenous cryogenic stage. Close to five minutes after lift-off, the cryogenic engine came to life but only very briefly. With thrust from that engine failing to pick up, the rocket soon tumbled into the sea.

In December the same year, the GSLV was flown again, this time with a Russian cryogenic stage. But disaster struck yet again, with the vehicle going out of control less than a minute into the flight, breaking up into pieces and exploding into flames over Sriharikota.

ISRO has gone to great lengths to learn from those failures and adopt suitable changes, say senior officials of the space agency.

The Russian cryogenic engine and stage design is complicated. Booster turbopumps installed at the bottom of the liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen tanks maintain a steady flow of propellants to the main turbopump.

Glitch rectified

Analysis of the data radioed down by the rocket during its April 2010 flight showed that the booster turbopump supplying liquid hydrogen had caused the problem. The turbopump had started up normally and attained a maximum speed of 34,800 revolutions per minute. But its rotation slowed after less than one second and stopped soon afterwards.

A detailed review concluded that one of the pump’s seals could have gripped the rotating shaft as a result of thermal deformation or some tiny contaminant becoming wedged somewhere. Alternatively, the casing of the turbine that drives the pump could have ruptured.

The review led to a tightening of manufacturing tolerances for the booster turbopump’s parts as well as more stringent procedures for its assembly. Extensive testing has also been introduced, including of the fully-assembled turbopumps.

The starting sequence for a cryogenic engine is a complex process, involving split-second timing. The cryogenic engine as well as the stage’s two small steering engines were tested briefly under simulated high-altitude conditions at ISRO’s Mahendragiri facility in Tamil Nadu to ensure that their ignition went smoothly.

In the GSLV’s December 2010 flight, a shroud, which protects the cryogenic engine during atmospheric flight, opened up as the rocket accelerated to supersonic speeds. In the process, it pulled apart connectors for electrical cables carrying control signals from onboard computers mounted near the top of the rocket to the rest of the vehicle. Out of control, the vehicle turned sharply and soon broke up. The shroud has now been strengthened and the connector mounting modified.

In its forthcoming mission, the GSLV is carrying GSAT-14, a communication satellite weighing close to two tonnes.

The rocket could launch seven more spacecraft over the next four years, according to ISRO Chairman K. Radhakrishnan. This could include four communication satellites, a meteorological satellite identical to the Insat-3D that was launched last month on Europe’s Ariane 5 rocket, the GISAT remote sensing satellite as well as Chandrayaan-2, the country’s next lunar exploration mission.

The cost of launching Insat-3D on Ariane 5, not including insurance, came to $82 million (Rs.490 crore), Dr. Radhakrishnan told this correspondent. The ‘marginal cost’ of each GSLV — that is, the additional expense the space agency incurs on the launch vehicle but which does not include all the organisational costs and investments for supporting the mission — came to about Rs.200 crore.

However, the current version of the GSLV will probably not be able to carry communication satellites weighing more than about 2.2 tonnes. ISRO has already launched several considerably heavier communication satellites aboard Ariane rockets. The Department of Space’s latest annual report shows eight more communication satellites being launched abroad over the next four years, including the GSAT-7 that will fly on the Ariane 5 later this month.

ISRO is in the process of developing a more powerful rocket, the GSLV Mark-III, that will be capable of carrying four-tonne-class communication satellites. The rocket’s giant solid propellant booster and its big liquid propellant stage have already been successfully tested on the ground. But an entirely new cryogenic engine and stage have also to be prepared.

Test firing of the GSLV Mark-III’s cryogenic engine would start soon and the intention was to have the entire vehicle ready for its first developmental flight by 2016-17, according to the ISRO chairman.

Quelle: The Hindu

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Quelle: ISRO

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Update: 19.08.2013 / 14.00 MESZ

GSLV-D5 Launch Called-Off

The Launch of the GSLV-D5 scheduled for 1650 hrs today (August 19, 2013) is called off, as a leak is observed in the UH25 fuel system of the liquid second stage during the pre-launch pressurisation phase on the vehicle just two hours before the scheduled lift-off.

The propellants are being drained from the Cryogenic Stage, Liquid Second Stage and the four liquid Strap-ons of GSLV-D5. The vehicle will be moved back to the Vehicle Assembly Building for further actions.

The revised launch date will be announced after a detailed assessment.

Quelle: ISRO

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Update: 20.08.2013

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ISRO may use standy engine to launch GSLV

Indian space agency ISRO will look at options of using a standby engine for the early launch of its heavy geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle (GSLV) after examining what forced the postponement of the launch Monday, an official said.

"We have a standby for the second stage engine. But first we have to study the problem. If the problem is due to a faulty component, then we have to look at the batch to which the component belonged and have to replace the entire components from that batch," an Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) official told IANS preferring anonymity.

He said there was no point in replacing an engine with another faulty one.

According to him, ISRO will look at different options like using a standby engine, replacing the component or correcting the problem.

"If the problem is external, it will be easy to correct. But if it is internal, then the engine may have to be dismantled," he said.

ISRO had called off the launch of its GSLV rocket carrying the communication satellite GSAT-14 after the liquid fuel started leaking like a tap from the rocket's second stage.

The GSLV is a three stage/engine with four strap-on motors hugging the first stage. The first stage is powered by solid fuel while the four strap-on motors and the second stage are powered by liquid fuel. The third is the cryogenic engine powered by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen.

"This is the first time we have seen such a fault," said a source close to ISRO.

According to officials, the second stage is identical for ISRO's two rockets - its lighter rocket polar satellite launch vehicle and GSLV.

While GSLV is under the development stage, the PSLV is termed as the space agency's workhorse and used to launch Indian and foreign satellites.

In 2010, ISRO had to postpone a PSLV launch as it found "a marginal drop in the pressure in the second stage of the vehicle during mandatory checks".

At that time the faulty part was inaccessible as the rocket stages had been fully assembled. ISRO had to dismantle the second stage to correct the fault.

In 2013, ISRO had to postpone the launch of its PSLV rocket carrying India's first navigational satellite after it found a problem in one of the electro-hydraulic control actuators in the second stage.

Here again, the fully assembled rocket had to be dismantled to replace the actuator, an assembly of several components.

In both cases, the second stage was not fuelled up and hence did not pose a problem for ISRO.

But the problem in the GSLV supposed to fly Aug 19 is complex as the leaking second stage was fuelled up and the third and critical stage - the cryogenic engine - was being fuelled for its flight.

"Some of the components in the second stage, like sealants, have limited life after fuelling. They might become brittle if not used within a specified period," officials told IANS.

The one comforting factor is that the crucial cryogenic engine is safe and it does not face such limited life component problems, an ISRO official IANS.

According to them, the first task for them is to drain the fuel from the second and third/cryogenic stage.

Following that, the engines will be decontaminated for fuel and traces of fuel.

"Then the rocket will be moved back to the assembly building and a detailed study of the problem will be made and corrective action will be taken," the official said.

However, ISRO officials could not say when the rocket would be ready for launch.

"Advanced countries test their stages several times before it is used in a rocket. In India, owing to vendor constraints, we have to make our rockets operational after a few tests," R.V. Perumal a retired ISRO rocket expert said.

Quelle: BS-India

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Update: 22.08.2013

Chennai: The Indian space agency will be able to take its heavy rocket geosynchronous satellite launch vehicle-development 5(GSLV-D5) back to the rocket assembly building either Saturday or Sunday, a senior official said.

 




"Our current priority is to clean the rocket's fuel systems and disconnect all the hoses and other connections to the second launch pad. This process would take a couple of days. We will be able to move the rocket to the assembly building Saturday or Sunday," the official, preferring anonymity, told IANS Wednesday.

India's spaceport is located in Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, around 80 km from here.

The Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) Monday called off the launch of its GSLV rocket carrying the communication satellite GSAT-14, after the liquid fuel started leaking like a tap from the rocket's second stage.

The GSLV is a three-stage launch vehicle with four strap-on motors hugging the first stage.

The first stage is powered by solid fuel, while the four strap-on motors and the second stage are powered by liquid fuel. The third is the cryogenic engine powered by liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen.

Another senior official told IANS that the rocket's engines would have to be decontaminated with ionized water and that would take two or three days.

The entire fuel in the rocket's four strap-on motors, second and cryogenic engine had been drained out Tuesday -- other activities are in progress.

According to officials, only after studying the problem and the solution could revised launch time be estimated.

Asked about earlier problems in the second stage of ISRO's lighter rocket polar satellite launch vehicle (PSLV) (both PSLV/GSLV have identical second stage), the official said: "Rocket engines are complex systems. A small problem might lead to a catastrophic result. It is good that the problem was detected on the ground."

He said if it was a design defect, it would have shown up much earlier, as more than 20 PSLV rockets have been successfully flown by India.

"A pattern could be drawn only if the problem crops up consistently in a component/system," he said.

In 2010, ISRO had to put off a PSLV launch as it found "a marginal drop in the pressure in the second stage of the vehicle during mandatory checks".

At that time, the faulty part was inaccessible as the rocket stages had been fully assembled. ISRO had to dismantle the second stage to correct the fault.

In June 2013, ISRO put off the launch of its PSLV rocket carrying India's first navigational satellite after it found a problem in one of the electro-hydraulic control actuators in the second stage.

Here again, the fully assembled rocket had to be dismantled to replace the actuator, an assembly of several components. The launch occurred successfully July 1 this year.

An expert in rocket technology who retired from ISRO, on condition of anonymity, told IANS that the Indian space agency cannot take any chances with its PSLV rocket as it is also being used for launching foreign satellites.

Quelle: INDIA-TV

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Update: 23.08.2013

GSLV Neustart wird mehrere Monate dauern

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It would be at least two months before the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle D5 (GSLV D5) blasts off from Sriharikota despite a dismayed Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) working overtime to figure out what went wrong last Monday.

“Even if the defect is found to be a minor one, it would take at least two months. The stages (GSLV is a three-stage rocket) have to be dismantled for examination. If it’s a major problem, it might take longer,’’ an ISRO source said from Sriharikota.

Another factor that will have a say in deciding the new launch date is the forthcoming north-east monsoon. The August 19 launch had to be aborted less than two hours to lift-off after a fuel leak was detected in the second stage.

Quelle: The New Indian Express

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Update: 31.08.2013

Restoration of GSLV-D5 Mission

The launch of GSLV-D5 (with Indian Cryogenic Stage), scheduled for 1650 hrs on August 19, 2013, had to be called off due to a leak observed in the UH25 Fuel system of the Liquid Second Stage, during the last lap of the countdown. At the time of calling off the Countdown, the GSLV Vehicle was loaded with 210 tons of liquid and cryogenic propellants. About 750 kg of UH25 Fuel had leaked out, leading to contamination of the area around the launch pad. It took 6 days of round-the-clock operations before the contamination could be reduced to the safe level to enable movement of the GSLV-D5 back to the Vehicle Assembly Building. The GSLV-D5 Launch Vehicle has been safely moved back to the Vehicle Assembly Building on the early morning of August 26, 2013. The Vehicle has been de-stacked.

Chairman, ISRO constituted a High Level Task Team on August 20, 2013, chaired by Shri K. Narayana, (former Director of Satish Dhawan Space Centre) to identify the cause of the leak and to work out an action plan for quick restoration of the Mission, taking into account the safety, reliability and life of the Liquid Second Stage and the four Liquid Strap-on stages, which were wetted with liquid propellants. The leak is suspected to be in the lower portion of the propellant tank or the fluid lines between the tank and fuel filling system of the Second stage. Detailed investigation of the leak is underway.

Quelle: ISRO

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Update: 18.11.2013

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With the Mars mission on its way, the focus is now back on the Made-in- India cryogenic stage and the GSLV D-5 mission. But the mission, whose original launch was scrubbed in August following a fuel leak, is likely to be delayed further.
The ISRO had fixed the relaunch for December 15. But the mission will be delayed to December-end at least as the debacle in August has made the space agency wary. The new launch date is expected to be finalised on Tuesday at a high-level meeting Bangalore called by ISRO chairman K Radhakrishnan.
A thorough overhaul of the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV) is currently underway at the Sathish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC), Sriharikota. “All the stages have been replaced, including the two S-139 solid fuel motors. This caused the delay. The electrical and mechanical assemblies are progressing on the launch vehicle.
Everything is progressing smoothly and we are racing against time to launch the mission by December- end,’’ a senior scientist with ISRO said. ISRO opted for a ‘re-do’ on the rocket as the first launch attempt - on August 19 - had to be called off due to a UH25 fuel leak in the second stage powered by a liquid fuel motor.
It had taken the agency six days to clean the launchpad and its environs of 750 kg of UH25 fuel that had leaked out. The India-built cryogenic engine - which powers the third, upper stage of the GSLV - is ready for flight, officials said. This stage will burn for 720 seconds. The primary aim of the mission is to qualify the cryo stage, even though the GSLV D-5 will also be carrying the 1980 kg GSAT-14 communication satellite which will be placed in an orbit with a perigee of 185 km.
Quelle: INDIANEXPRESS

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Update: 16.12.2013

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Update: 20.12.2013

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Isro targeting a 5 January launch for GSLV-D5

Integration of GSLV-D5 almost complete, Isro to assemble heat shield with spacecraft GSAT-14 by next week
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New Delhi: The Indian Space Research Organization (Isro) is targeting a 5 January launch of the GSAT-14 satellite aboard the Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-D5).
“The integration of the GSLV-D5 is almost complete, and we plan to assemble the heat shield with the spacecraft, GSAT-14, by next week,” said an Isro spokesperson.
The launch of the GSLV D5, which has an indigenous cryogenic engine, was aborted two hours before its launch on 19 August because of a fuel leak in its second stage. Since then, Isro has replaced the second stage with a new one and refurbished the liquid strap-ons. Although the cryogenic stage is the same, it has undergone all necessary tests.
“All three stages have undergone necessary tests for qualification, while integrated tests are in progress,” said the Isro spokesperson. “By the weekend, we will have a review that will finalize the date and time of the launch.”
Isro had completed the integration of the second stage and that of the cryogenic stage of the launch vehicle. The space agency is targeting to lauch the communication satellite GSAT-14 at 1618 hours from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Sriharikota, Andhra Pradesh.
Quelle: live mint
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Update: 22.12.2013
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The flight test of rejuvenated Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-D5) with indigenous cryogenic engine is likely to take place on January five from the space port of Sriharikota in Andhra Pradesh, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO) said.

ISRO’s Mission Readiness Review (MRR) team will meet on December 27 to take a final call on the launch of GSLV-D5. Its mission was aborted at the 11th hour on August 19, this year due to a fuel leak in its second stage.

"We have targeted the launch on January 5 afternoon; MRR team will meet on December 27 to take stock of the readiness and will finalise the date and time for the launch", ISRO spokesperson Deviprasad Karnik told PTI.

GSLV-D5 will put the communications satellite GSAT-14 into orbit.

All the three stages of the vehicle have already been integrated, Karnik said, adding, the "satellite will be mated with the launch vehicle next week". He said, "....Everything should be ready by December 26, MMR team will meet on December 27. It will review and decide on the launch".

The launch of GSLV-D5 scheduled at 1650 hours on August 19 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre (SDSC) at Sriharikota, was called-off after a leak was detected in the fuel system of the liquid second stage in pre-launch pressurisation phase on the vehicle, just two hours before lift-off.

The propellants were later drained from the cryogenic stage, liquid second stage and the four liquid strap-ons of GSLV-D5 and the vehicle was moved back to the Vehicle Assembly Building in SDSC.

Fuel tank made of aluminium alloy called Afnor 7020 tended to develop crack over a period of time and the leak was blamed on it.

In response to a question, Karnik said, "It is entirely a new tank this time".

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It will feature an indigenous cryogenic engine in its third stage

The refurbished Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-D5) is getting ready to lift off at 4.18 p.m. on January 5, 2014, from the second launch pad at Sriharikota and it will put the communication satellite GSAT-14 into orbit. The GSLV-D5 will feature an indigenous cryogenic engine in its third, uppermost stage.

“We are moving towards the launch by January 5,” said K. Radhakrishnan, Chairman, Indian Space Research Organisation (ISRO). “All the four stages of the vehicle have already been integrated. The satellite will be mated with the launch vehicle by December 27,” he added.

‘All checks completed’

The Mission Readiness Review (MRR) team will meet on December 27 to give the formal clearance for the launch. “By then, everything would have been inspected. All checks on the vehicle would have been completed. Phase III, level I checks have already been done,” said Dr. Radhakrishnan.

ISRO is looking forward to this launch because the GSLV-D5 uses an indigenous cryogenic engine and the vehicle suffered a major snag on August 19, 2013 on the day of the launch. About 75 minutes before the lift-off, the liquid fuel in the propellant tank in the rocket’s second stage started leaking and rained down on the vehicle, forcing ISRO to call off the launch. Fumes engulfed the first and second stages of the vehicle, causing tense moments.

The leak was blamed on the fuel tank made of aluminium alloy called Afnor 7020 which tended to develop cracks over a period of time. The GSLV-D5 was dismantled and the “restoration process” done under the guidance of K. Narayana, former Director, Satish Dhawan Space Centre, Sriharikota. The GSAT-14 communication satellite, which was encapsulated in the heat shield, was preserved and tested periodically.

Since the liquid fuel leaked from the second stage tank made of aluminium alloy Afnor 7020, the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC), ISRO, Mahendragiri, Tamil Nadu, came up with a new second stage with its propellant tank made of aluminium alloy 2219. The four strap-on booster motors were refurbished. The rocket’s first stage, which uses solid propellants, has been replaced with a new one. The restored vehicle has new electronic components because the components in the four strap-on motors in the earlier vehicle had become wet from the fuel leak.

‘Critical components tested’

“Everything is going perfectly well [for the launch on January 5],” said M.C. Dathan, Director, LPSC, on Saturday evening. “Eighty per cent of the systems in the GSLV-D5, including the four strap-on liquid motors, the second liquid stage and the cryogenic stage are from the LPSC,” he said. The GSLV-D5’s cryogenic stage had been stored for the past three months-and-a-half. Mr. Dathan added: “The cryogenic stage’s critical components and valves have been tested, and found in good condition. There are three levels of checks on the vehicle. Phase III, level I checks have been done. This means all the fluid lines and electrical circuits have been checked. Everything is giving results as expected. We are ready to go ahead with the launch.”

The GSLV-D5 is a three-stage, 414-tonne and 49-metre tall vehicle.

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The four strap-on booster motors of the GSLV-D5 being strapped around the rocket’s core in the first stage in the Vehicle Assembly Building of the second launch pad at Sriharikota in December 2013.

Quelle: The Hindu

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Update: 28.12.2013

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Preparations reviewed for GSLV-D5 launch on Jan 5

THIRUVANANTHAPURAM: After the Mission Readiness Meet on Friday for the launch of the GSLV-D5 from Sriharikota, ISRO officials informed that the vehicle will be moved to the launch pad on Saturday for the launch set for Jan 5.

"The mission readiness meet went on well and the vehicle will move to the launch pad tomorrow for its launch on Jan 5," Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC) director S Ramakrishnan told TOI.

"This readiness for the successful launch of GSLV-D5 will prove effective for the next Mars Mission after two years, as the window for its launch comes once in two years," he said. Current Mars Mission through PSLV-C25 has a limited payload to carry five instruments, while the GSLV will have a heavier satellite payload, he said.

Earlier in Aug 19 this year, an anomaly in the second stage of liquid propellant of GSLV-D5 prompted ISRO to call off the launch. Now, it is all rectified and the third stage indigenous cryogenic engine too has been tested and is ready for GSLV-D5 launch, he said. A high-end version of the heavy cryogenic engine C-25 stage is being designed with 25 ton propellant loading and 20 tonnes of engine thrust for the GSLV MK-3 D-1 mission in early 2017, he said. The huge cryogenic engine is slated for completion and testing by 2015, he said.

The preparations regarding the readiness of the satellite launch vehicle for the mission has been reviewed and currently the launch of GSLV-D5 is set for Jan 5, Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) director M Chandradathan told TOI.

More than 100 scientists from ISRO establishments including VSSC, LPSC and Isro Inertial Systems Unit are at Sriharikota for the GSLV-D5 launch.

Simultaneously, the preparations are on for two more PSLV launches slated in the first quarter of next year including India's Remote Sensing Satellite IRNSS-1B and French satellite Spot 7, PSLV project director P Kunhikrishnan said.

Quelle: THE TIMES OF INDIA

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Update: 30.12.2013

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GSLV-D5 launch cleared by Isro's team

29-hour countdown for the launch is expected to commence on January 4

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The Indian Space Research Organisation's () Mission Readiness Review (MRR) team and the Launch Authorisation Board (LAB) have cleared the -D5/-14 launch, which is scheduled for January 5, 2014.

The 29-hour countdown for the launch is expected to commence on January 4.

Isro said on Saturday that the MRR and LAB have cleared the launch and the launch time was fixed at 16:18 hours (IST) on January 5, 2014.

The vehicle has been moved from the vehicle assembly building to the umbilical tower (the launch pad) on December 28, 2013, it added.

After three continuous failures, GSLV (Geosynchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle) is now getting ready for its new mission and this time Isro, which successfully concluded crucial stages of the Mars Mission, is confident that the launch will be successful.

The mission of the GSLV-D5 would be to carry the advanced GSAT-14 into orbit. The GSAT-14 will be used for telecasting and telecommunication purposes. Its mission life is 12 years.

The vehicle carries indigenous cryogenic engine, which will be used for the second time in the GSLV. It was developed by ISRO’s Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) at Mahendragiri, near Nagercoil in Tamil Nadu. The first flight, which used the Indian made cryogenic engine, failed in April 2010.

This would be the eighth flight of GSLV and the second flight of GSLV with the indigenous cryogenic upper stage (CUS) developed by the Liquid Propulsion Systems Centre (LPSC) of Isro.

It may be noted that the GSLV-D5 was scheduled for launch at 16.50 hrs on August 19, 2013, from Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota, but the launch was called off at the last minute after a leak was found during the pre-launch pressurisation process in the fuel system of the liquid second stage.

The GSLV was first launched with GSAT-1 on April 18, 2001, which was a successful mission.

Out of the seven GSLV launches earlier, three were unsuccessful. The GSLV-F02 launched with INSAT-4C on July 10, 2006, GSLV-D3 launched with GSAT-4 on April 15, 2010 and GSLV-F06 launched with GSAT-5P on December 25, 2010 were unsuccessful, according to the Isro website. In the first mission, the GSLV-D1, the Russian Cryo underperformed and in 2007, in the GSLV-F04 mission, one strap-on control met with failure though both the missions were successful.

Quelle: BS

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Update: 1.01.2014

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Quelle: ISRO

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Update: 4.01.2014

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29-hour countdown for launch of GSLV-D5 commences

The 29-hour countdown for the launch of ISRO's rejuvenated Geo-synchronous Satellite Launch Vehicle (GSLV-D5) commenced at 11.18 am today at Satish Dhawan Space Centre at Sriharikota.

"The 29-hour countdown for tomorrow's launch at 4.18 PM of GSLV-D5 carrying 1,980 kg GSAT-14 communication satellite commenced as planned and is progressing smoothly," ISRO spokesperson Deviprasad Karnik told PTI.

The GSLV-D5's first mission attempt with indigenous cryogenic engine was aborted at the eleventh hour on August 19 last year due to a fuel leak in its second stage.

Fuel tank made of aluminium alloy called Afnor 7020 tended to develop crack over a period of time and the leak was blamed on it.

The GSLV is designed to inject its passenger spacecraft into the intended Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit with a combination of solid, earth-storable liquid and cryogenic propellants in it?s first, second and third stages, respectively.

GSLV-D5 being moved from Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad

Quelle: hindustantimes / ISRO

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Update: 5.01.2014

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Quelle: ISRO

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Update:

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Quelle: Frams - NDTV

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Update:

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Vice President Hamid Ansari and Prime Minister Manmohan Singh today hailed the successful launch of GSLV D5 satellite as an important step in the area of science and technology and congratulated the ISRO scientists for the feat.
Ansari said that with this launch using the indigenous cryogenic engine, India has joined a select group of countries that have mastered this sophisticated space technology.
"All credit goes to our scientists and engineers for their competence, hard work and dedication. The nation is proud of them," he said in his message.
Singh, while congratulating the scientists, said the launch marked "another important step that the country has taken in the area of science and technology."
Congress President Sonia Gandhi, too, congratulated ISRO and its scientists for the successful launch.
Terming the GSLV-D5 launch as a remarkable step forward in the advancement of space sciences, Gandhi said the nation will look up with gratitude to the team of scientists behind the feat.
"By using an indigenous cryogenic engine, they have not only ended our reliance on other countries but smartly and effectively graduated from the PSLV range of space vehicles," she said.
Meanwhile, Andhra Pradesh Chief Minister N Kiran Kumar Reddy, Telugu Desam Party (TDP) head N Chandrababu Naidu and other leaders also congratulated IISRO scientists.
Chief Minister Reddy hailed the launch saying it was a "historic day for India".
"The successful launch (of GSLV-D5)... Is testimony to ISRO's mastery of the cryogenic launch vehicle technology," he said.
Naidu lauded the ISRO scientists for having put India on a par with the developed countries.
YSR Congress president YS Jaganmohan Reddy, too, praised ISRO scientists for the successful launch.


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India successfully launched rejuvenated indigenous cryogenic engine- fitted GSLV-D5 carrying communication satellite GSAT-14 from Satish Dhawan Space Centre. (Courtesy: ISRO)

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Tags: ISRO-GSAT-14 GSLV-D5 India GSLV-D5 rocket GSLV-D5 

2886 Views

Sonntag, 5. Januar 2014 - 12:00 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Rückblick auf Expedition 38-Russian EVA

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Cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy Performs Spacewalk

ISS038-E-022930 (27 Dec. 2013) --- Russian cosmonaut Sergey Ryazanskiy, Expedition 38 flight engineer, attired in a Russian Orlan spacesuit, participates in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the eight-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Ryazanskiy and Russian cosmonaut Oleg Kotov (out of frame), commander, worked with two high-fidelity cameras, removed the Vsplesk experiment package and jettisoned it and replaced it with hardware for a more sophisticated earthquake-monitoring experiment, Seismoprognoz, which they attached to a Zvezda handrail.

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Station Cosmonauts Perform Spacewalk

ISS038-E-022888 (27 Dec. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov (right), Expedition 38 commander; and Sergey Ryazanskiy, flight engineer, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the eight-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy worked with two high-fidelity cameras, removed the Vsplesk experiment package and jettisoned it and replaced it with hardware for a more sophisticated earthquake-monitoring experiment, Seismoprognoz, which they attached to a Zvezda handrail.

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Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy

ISS038-E-021682 (27 Dec. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov, Expedition 38 commander; and Sergey Ryazanskiy, flight engineer, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the eight-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy worked with two high-fidelity cameras, removed the Vsplesk experiment package and jettisoned it and replaced it with hardware for a more sophisticated earthquake-monitoring experiment, Seismoprognoz, which they attached to a Zvezda handrail.

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Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy

ISS038-E-021684 (27 Dec. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov, Expedition 38 commander; and Sergey Ryazanskiy, flight engineer, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the eight-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy worked with two high-fidelity cameras, removed the Vsplesk experiment package and jettisoned it and replaced it with hardware for a more sophisticated earthquake-monitoring experiment, Seismoprognoz, which they attached to a Zvezda handrail.

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Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy

ISS038-E-021686 (27 Dec. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov, Expedition 38 commander; and Sergey Ryazanskiy, flight engineer, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the eight-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy worked with two high-fidelity cameras, removed the Vsplesk experiment package and jettisoned it and replaced it with hardware for a more sophisticated earthquake-monitoring experiment, Seismoprognoz, which they attached to a Zvezda handrail.

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Oleg Kotov and Sergey Ryazanskiy

ISS038-E-021696 (27 Dec. 2013) --- Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov, Expedition 38 commander; and Sergey Ryazanskiy, flight engineer, attired in Russian Orlan spacesuits, participate in a session of extravehicular activity (EVA) in support of assembly and maintenance on the International Space Station. During the eight-hour, seven-minute spacewalk, Kotov and Ryazanskiy worked with two high-fidelity cameras, removed the Vsplesk experiment package and jettisoned it and replaced it with hardware for a more sophisticated earthquake-monitoring experiment, Seismoprognoz, which they attached to a Zvezda handrail.

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Quelle: NASA

 

 

 


Tags: Russian cosmonauts Oleg Kotov flight engineer 

2472 Views

Samstag, 4. Januar 2014 - 15:00 Uhr

Mars-Chroniken - 10 Jahre MARS-ROVER - Mars-Rover Opportunity Sol 086-100 Rückblick

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Ten years after landing on Mars, Spirit rover's legacy lives on

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It's been 10 years since NASA's Spirit rover landed on Mars, kicking off a decade of continuous robotic operations on the Red Planet's surface. And even though Spirit gave up the ghost three years ago, the hardy machine still serves as an inspiration.

Cushioned by airbags, the six-wheeled, golf-cart-sized rover settled in Gusev Crater at 11:35 p.m. ET on Jan. 3, 2004. Among the millions who followed the landing coverage was Bekah Sosland, a 14-year-old eighth-grader in Fredericksburg, Texas. A TV animation that aired in her classroom showed the unorthodox landing procedure that was used by Spirit — and by its twin rover, Opportunity, which touched down three weeks later. 

"I remember I was talking with friends, and out of the corner of my eye I noticed this thing bouncing and rolling on a red surface," Sosland said in a NASA online retrospective published Friday. "I watched as it stopped and opened up, and it had this rover inside."

The sight amazed her. "Gears started turning in my head that day about engineering and space — thinking about a career," she said.

Sosland eventually earned an engineering degree from the University of Texas, and this summer, she became part of the Opportunity rover's mission planning team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "I'm loving that I can be a part of this team now," she said.

Others at NASA are loving it as well. Spirit and Opportunity — known as the Mars Exploration Rovers, or MERs — were designed for primary missions lasting just 90 days. But Spirit kept plugging along until 2009, when it became mired in a Martian sand trap. It fell silent a year later. Its odometer read 4.8 miles, or 7.7 kilometers.

Opportunity has been even more of an overachiever. It's still going strong on the other side of the planet, in a region known as Meridiani Planum, with 24 miles (38.7 kilometers) of driving under its belt.

Both rovers found ample evidence that Mars was once much warmer and wetter than it is today. Spirit's biggest finds were deposits of pure silica that suggested hydrothermal vents were once active on Mars. The MER missions set the stage for even more high-powered observations by NASA's car-sized Curiosity rover, which landed in a different patch of Martian terrain last year.

Quelle: NBC

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21.11.2013

Rückblicke zu Mars-Rover Opportunity gibt es unter Mars-Chroniken -  Mars-Rover Opportunity Sol 001-100 Rückblick in mehreren Teilen, welche auch fortgesetzt wird

 

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Left Front Hazard Camera Non-linearized Sub-frame EDR acquired on Sol 91 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 13:41:56 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 92 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 15:21:10 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 1 (436 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 93 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:27:25 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 1 (436 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 93 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 10:43:08 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 1 (436 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Right Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 93 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:26:20 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Left Front Hazard Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 93 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:23:40 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 94 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:51:23 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 2 (753 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 94 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:45:55 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 6 (934 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Left Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 94 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 17:47:07 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL
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Right Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 94 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:37:11 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL
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Left Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 95 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:34:48 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Right Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 95 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:31:46 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 14:44:05 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 6 (934 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 14:40:32 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 6 (482 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 14:14:32 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 2 (754 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 14:07:11 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 6 (482 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:19:45 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (1009 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:25:06 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 1 (436 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Left Front Hazard Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 96 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:59:20 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 97 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 15:19:09 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 2 (753 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Right Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 97 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 13:56:15 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (1009 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 97 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 13:44:53 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 5 (535 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Left Front Hazard Camera Non-linearized Downsampled EDR acquired on Sol 97 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:35:21 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 98 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 13:35:04 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (432 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 98 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 13:34:05 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (432 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 99 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:54:22 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (432 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 99 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 11:53:04 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (432 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell
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Left Front Hazard Camera Non-linearized Downsampled EDR acquired on Sol 99 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 16:45:18 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL
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Microscopic Imager Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 100 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately at approximately 11:57:27 Mars local solar time, Microscopic Imager dust cover commanded to be OPEN. NASA/JPL/Cornell/USGS 
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Left Panoramic Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 100 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:33:34 Mars local solar time, camera commanded to use Filter 7 (432 nm). NASA/JPL/Cornell 
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Left Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 100 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:37:09 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Left Navigation Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 100 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 10:37:32 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL 
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Right Front Hazard Camera Non-linearized Full frame EDR acquired on Sol 100 of Opportunity's mission to Meridiani Planum at approximately 12:55:17 Mars local solar time. NASA/JPL
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Fotos: NASA

2894 Views

Samstag, 4. Januar 2014 - 14:17 Uhr

UFO-Forschung - Die bizarre UFO-Welt der Exopolitik

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Kanadischer Ex-Minister warnt"Wenn wir Ufos abschießen, droht der Krieg der Sterne"

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Der ehemalige kanadische Verteidigungsminister Paul Hellyer fürchtet einen interstellaren Krieg. Er glaubt, dass wir nicht allein im Universum sind und einige Aliens sogar als Nonnen verkleidet unter uns leben. Das Best Of eines wirklich bizarren Interviews.

Bis 1960 war er Verteidigungsminister Kanadas, schon damals glaubte er an intelligentes Leben im All. Der russische TV-Sender „Russia Today“ wollte das jetzt nochmal genauer wissen und hat den ehemaligen Politiker interviewt. In dem Gespräch, sagte Paul Hellyer, er wisse, dass Ufos echt seien. „In der Tat besuchen sie unseren Planeten schon seit Tausenden von Jahren“, sagte der ehemalige Politiker.

„Wir schauen auf eine lange Geschichte von Ufos und natürlich gab es in den letzten Jahrzehnten viel mehr Aktivität, seit wir die Atombombe erfunden haben.“ Die Außerirdischen plage eine sehr menschliche Angst, erklärte er dem Sender „dass wir dumm genug sind, wieder Atomwaffen einzusetzen“.

Ufo über Bethlehem?

Als die Interviewerin darauf hinwies, dass noch kein Wissenschaftler öffentlich die Existenz von Außerirdischen bestätigte, sagte Hellyer, sie müssten sich geradezu anstrengen, um es nicht herauszufinden. „Es gibt einfach so viel Beweise, wenn jemand sich nur die Zeit nehmen würde es ein bisschen zu recherchieren und zu studieren.“ Er werde mehrmals die Woche von Leuten kontaktiert, die Ufos gesehen hätten oder sogar auf Raumschiffen oder anderen Planeten waren.

Er selbst habe zwar keine Aliens getroffen, aber in der Nähe seiner Hütte am Lake Muskoka, etwa 120 Meilen nördlich von Toronto, schon ein Ufo gesichtet. Es sei viel heller als ein Stern gewesen und habe innerhalb von Sekunden seine Richtung geändert. „Es gibt keine Satelliten, die das können.“ Auch der Stern über Bethlehem war eine von “Gottes fliegenden Untertassen” gewesen.

„Nordic Blondes“ sehen aus wie Skandinavier

Hellyer vermutet 80 verschiedene Spezies, von denen einige aussähen wie wir und auf der Straße nicht zu erkennen seien. Man nenne sie „Nordic Blondes“, sie sähen aus wie hellhäutige Skandinavier. „Einige von ihren Frauen sind sogar als Nonnen verkleidet nach Las Vegas zum Shoppen gegangen und keiner hat sie erkannt,” so Hellyer. Es gebe aber auch die kleinen „Short Grey´s“ mit dünnen Armen und Beinen und einem sehr großen Kopf, wie man sie aus Cartoons kenne.

Eine Gefahr seien die meisten von Ihnen jedoch nicht, nur ein oder zwei Spezies könnten den Menschen gefährlich werden. „Das ist eines der Dinge, die ich gerade versuche, herauszufinden; wer diese gefährlichen Spezies sind und was sie wirklich planen.“ Technologisch seien die Aliens ohnehin Lichtjahre weiter als wir. Deswegen sei es ein Fehler, jedes Ufo wie bisher ungefragt abzuschießen, denn dies könne letztlich einen interstellaren Krieg provozieren. „Ich denke, es wäre ein Fehler eine eigene Sternenkrieg-Flotte zur Verteidigung aufzubauen, stattdessen sollten wir mit den freundlichen Spezien zusammenarbeiten.”

Quelle: Focus

Interessant ist dabei auch die Identitätskrise "der drei großen deutschen UFO-GRUPPEN"  zu beobachten welche sich 2008 unter den Schirm der Exopolitik begaben und nun sich winden um für sich selbst glaubhafte Standpunkte zu finden: Einerseits braucht man die Ufogläubigen welche in den oben aufgeführten UFO-Welten zu hause sind für die eigenen Publikationen und andererseits sucht man das Heil in dem man genau diesen UFO-Welten in offiziellen Statements widerspricht. So wird man noch unglaubwürdiger für die Ufogläubigen sowie auch für Interessierte welche das UFO-Thema streifen. Fliegende Untertassen in der Headline und ein Lacher für "We are not alone"...


2929 Views

Samstag, 4. Januar 2014 - 13:20 Uhr

Luftfahrt - NASA forscht an sicheren und effiziente Integration von unbemannten Systemen im nationalen Luftraum

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A NASA Langley researcher fuels up the remotely piloted AirSTAR model during flight tests at NASA's Wallops Island.
Image Credit: 
NASA photo
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UAS Test Site Selection Good News for NASA Langley, Wallops

The selection of six unmanned aircraft system (UAS) test sites by the Federal Aviation Administration may have an impact on NASA aeronautics research, especially at two NASA Virginia facilities.

NASA's Langley Research Center in Hampton and NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Virginia's Eastern Shore are expected to work with the Virginia Tech team, which is based in Blacksburg.  According to the FAA, Virginia Tech plans to conduct UAS failure mode testing and identify and evaluate operational and technical risks areas. This proposal includes test site range locations in both Virginia and New Jersey.

"Aeronautics researchers at NASA Langley are thrilled that the selection of unmanned aircraft system test sites has been made and that the country is moving forward to do the work needed to integrate unmanned aerial systems into the national airspace," said David Hinton, deputy director for aeronautics research and technology at NASA Langley. "With Langley's years of research experience in airspace operations, unmanned systems, sense and avoid technology, autonomy and other technical areas we look forward to working with any of the teams selected to help advance and expand the safe use of unmanned aerial systems."

NASA Langley uses unmanned aircraft, such as a scaled airliner model, in its own aviation safety research. Langley researchers have flown the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research or AirSTAR model at a Wallops test range.

"The safe and efficient integration of unmanned aerial systems into the National Airspace System is an important national goal, and we at NASA Wallops stand poised and ready to support related testing in the Mid-Atlantic Region," said Wallops Director Bill Wrobel. "Wallops’ location, instrumentation capabilities, restricted airspace, established safety program and past experience in flying unmanned aerials systems make it a valuable member of the team supporting this great endeavor."

NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate has an already-established project, called UAS Integration in the NAS (National Airspace System), to help contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with routine civilian use of unmanned aircraft. NASA has identified five subprojects to address some of the technical challenges: Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability; Human Systems Integration; Communications; Certification; and Integrated Test and Evaluation.

"NASA has testing we plan to do in the next three years, so while we already have airspace we can use, we may also be able to take advantage of the new test sites," said Ed Waggoner, head of NASA's Integrated Systems Research Project, which oversees the UAS project. "The FAA included NASA and other federal agencies in the review process for the test site selection."

To date, the primary user of unmanned systems, more commonly known as drones, has been the military. Current federal civil aviation regulations are based on a pilot being in the aircraft. Few regulations exist that specifically address UAS. To allow seamless operation of civil unmanned aircraft, technologies and procedures need to be developed, validated and employed by the FAA. NASA research will contribute data needed to help define requirements, regulations and other issues.

According to an FAA fact sheet, "The FAA has selected six UAS test site operators that will allow the agency to develop research findings and operational experiences to help ensure the safe integration of UAS into the nation's airspace as we transition to a system featuring NextGen technologies and procedure."

"While the selection of these test sites will not allow immediate access to the national airspace system for commercial and civil purposes, data and other information related to the operation of UAS that is generated by the six test site operators will help the FAA answer key research questions such as solutions for 'sense and avoid,' command and control, ground control station standards and human factors, airworthiness, lost link procedures and the interface with the air traffic control system. This data will help the FAA to develop regulations and operational procedures for future commercial and civil use of the NAS."

The other test site operators chosen are the University of Alaska, the state of Nevada, New York's Griffiss International Airport, the North Dakota Department of Commerce, and Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi.

NASA Langley researchers have also worked in the past with part of the North Dakota team, using a Cirrus SR-22 aircraft as an unmanned aircraft technology testbed to assess "sense and avoid" computer software in Grand Forks, N.D.

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A NASA Langley unmanned aerial system technology testbed flight tested "sense and avoid" computer software in Grand Forks, N.D. In 2012 and 2013.
Image Credit: 
NASA/Kathy Barnstorff
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Quelle: NASA

Tags: Wallops 

2494 Views

Samstag, 4. Januar 2014 - 11:29 Uhr

Astronomie - Relikt des jungen Universum in der Nähe gefunden

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GROWTH SPURT  All of the stars in galaxy NGC 1277 formed in a rapid burst 12 billion years ago. The galaxy’s ancient, massive black hole probably formed quickly too.

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A galaxy just over 230 million light-years away in the nearby Perseus cluster looks as if it was snatched from the dawn of time and delivered to our galactic neighborhood, new observations reveal. The galaxy, NGC 1277, formed all its stars in a quick burst roughly 12 billion years ago — less than 2 billion years after the Big Bang. Then it appears to have abruptly switched off.

Observations published in the Jan. 10 Astrophysical Journal Letters show that stars throughout the galaxy are uniformly old and formed in a 100-million-year-long flash that created new suns at a rate of up to 1,000 per year. For comparison, our Milky Way gives birth to only a few suns each year.

Quelle: ScienceNews


2510 Views

Freitag, 3. Januar 2014 - 17:15 Uhr

Astronomie - 5-Meter-Asteroid-2014AA verglüht in der Atmosphäre

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A small asteroid hit Earth just hours after it was first discovered, astronomers said, but likely burned up in the planet’s atmosphere.

The five-meter-wide (16-foot) object, which astronomers named 2014 AA, “almost certainly hit the Earth’s atmosphere” on Thursday morning, scientists at the International Astronomer Union’s Minor Planet Center said.

The asteroid entered the Earth’s atmosphere over the Atlantic Ocean somewhere between Central America and East Africa, most likely off the coast of West Africa, at about 2:30 a.m. Universal Time (8:30 a.m. Moscow time), according to calculations by dynamicist Stephen Chesley.

Physicist Peter Brown told Sky & Telescope Magazine that the asteroid’s impact energy was equivalent to the explosive power of 500 to 1,000 tons of TNT and was no bigger than a small car, meaning it was too small to reach the ground intact.

2014 AA is the first asteroid to be discovered this year.

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Second tiny asteroid spotted before it hit Earth

The first new asteroid identified this year didn't last long. Asteroid 2014 AA was spotted by a telescope early New Year's morning, and fizzled up over the Atlantic Ocean a day later.

2014 AA is only the second incoming object astronomers have tracked before it hit the Earth – and they almost missed it. The first such object, 2008 TC3, was discovered on 6 October 2008 about 20 hours before it became a fireball over Sudan.

Word of 2008 TC3's approach spread quickly, allowing observers to track it and predict when and where it would hit the atmosphere to within about a second and a kilometre, says Bill Gray, an amateur astronomer in Maine who calculates asteroid orbits. Thanks to that precision, a team from the University of Khartoum, Sudan, was able to recover fragments that reached the ground.

Astronomers were not so lucky with 2014 AA. Like 2008 TC3, the new asteroid was discovered with an automated telescope in the Catalina Mountains north of Tucson by the University of Arizona's Mount Lemmon Survey. The survey automatically tracks moving objects and calculates preliminary orbits, and then posts the data to a network of astronomers for follow-up observations.

Holiday arrival

But 2014 AA's holiday-period arrival meant it nearly slipped by unnoticed. With only 90 minutes of automatic observations recorded, Gray calculated the object's orbit in the evening of 1 January and realised it was on a collision course with Earth. He had insufficient data to pinpoint the time and place of impact, but preliminary analysis of infrasound observations has since narrowed it down to around 0200 GMT in the mid-Atlantic, says Steve Chesley of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

The asteroid was 2 to 4 metres wide, which makes it a little smaller than 2008 TC3 and much smaller than the 17-metre-wide meteor that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia, in February 2013.

Objects of 2014 AA's size hit Earth every few months, and are too small to pose a threat to the planet. But tracking their motions through the atmosphere could help astronomers recover the pieces that survive, says Peter Jenniskens of the SETI Institute in Mountain View, California, who led the effort to collect meteorites from 2008 TC3 and the Chelyabinsk meteor.

Although 2014 AA is probably lost to the sea, learning to track others like it could have big payoffs for science. "It's like a low-cost sample-return mission," he says.

Quelle: NewScientist

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UPDATE:

First 2014 Asteroid Discovered

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This animated GIF shows Asteroid 2014 AA, discovered by the NASA-sponsored Catalina Sky Survey on Jan. 1, 2014, as it moved across the sky.
Image Credit: 
CSS/LPL/UA
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Early Wednesday morning (Jan. 1, 2014), while New Year's 2014 celebrations were still underway in the United States, the Catalina Sky Survey near Tucson, Ariz., collected a single track of observations with an immediate follow-up on what was possibly a very small asteroid -- 7 to 10 feet (2 to 3 meters) in size -- on a potential impact trajectory with Earth.

Designated 2014 AA, which would make it the first asteroid discovery of 2014, the track of observations on the object allowed only an uncertain orbit to be calculated. However, if this was a very small asteroid on an Earth-impacting trajectory, it most likely entered Earth's atmosphere sometime between 11 a.m. PST (2 p.m. EST) Wednesday and 6 a.m. PST (9 a.m. EST) Thursday.

Using the only available observations, three independent projections of the possible orbit by the independent orbit analyst Bill Gray, of the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Mass., and Steve Chesley, of NASA's Near-Earth Object Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif., are in agreement that 2014 AA would hit Earth's atmosphere. According to Chesley, the potential impact locations are widely distributed because of the orbit uncertainty, falling along an arc extending from Central America to East Africa. The most likely impact location of the object was just off the coast of West Africa at about 6 p.m. PST (9 p.m. EST) Jan. 1.

It is unlikely asteroid 2014 AA would have survived atmospheric entry intact, as it was comparable in size to asteroid 2008 TC3, which was about 7 to 10 feet (2 to 3 meters) in size. 2008 TC3 completely broke up over northern Sudan in October 2008. Asteroid 2008 TC3 is the only other example of an object discovered just prior to hitting Earth. So far, there have been a few weak signals collected from infrasound stations in that region of the world that are being analyzed to see if they could be correlated to the atmospheric entry of 2014 AA.

NASA's Near-Earth Object Program at NASA Headquarters, Washington, manages and funds the search, study and monitoring of asteroids and comets whose orbits periodically bring them close to Earth. JPL manages the Near-Earth Object Program Office for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena.

Quelle: NASA

 


Tags: 5-Meter-Asteroid Hits Earth Burns Up in Atmosphere 

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Freitag, 3. Januar 2014 - 14:00 Uhr

Raumfahrt - Iran will Satelliten im Februar 2014 starten

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An Iranian aerospace official says the country plans to launch an indigenously designed and manufactured satellite into orbit in early February next year. 

Deputy head of Iran Space Agency (ISA), Hamid Fazeli, said on Tuesday that final tests are being carried out on several indigenous satellites. They include Sharif Sat, developed by Iranian students and academics from Sharif University of Technology, and AUT Sat, developed by Iranian scientists at Amir Kabir University of Technology.

He added that the launch is intended to mark the Ten-Day Dawn celebrations, which commemorate the 35th anniversary of the victory of Iran’s 1979 Islamic Revolution and will be held on February 1-11, 2014, in Iran and several other countries.

Sharif Sat reportedly weighs less than 50 kilograms and is planned to be placed into a Low Earth Orbit (LEO) at an altitude between 350 kilometers (217 miles) and 500 kilometers (310 miles) above the Earth's surface.

The satellite will capture images with a high degree of accuracy and transmit them to stations on earth.

AUT Sat is a monitoring and telecommunications satellite, which weighs 100 kilograms. It is expected to have a lifespan of two years.

Iran launched its first indigenous satellite, Omid (Hope), in 2009. The country also sent its first bio-capsule containing living creatures into the space in February 2010, using the indigenous Kavoshgar-3 (Explorer-3) carrier.

The country is one of the 24 founding members of the UN Committee on the Peaceful Uses of Outer Space, which was set up in 1959.

Quelle: Iran PressTV


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Freitag, 3. Januar 2014 - 12:45 Uhr

UFO-Forschung - UFO-Absturz bei Roswell 1947 ? Teil-3

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The Roswell corner

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New Fireman witness
Roswell investigators and authors continue to look for more story tellers to make it seem like everybody in town knew about the greatest secret ever kept. Now we are told that an aging old fireman “proves” that Frankie Rowe’s story is true! After all the other pretenders that have turned up over the years, it is nice to hear about another “reliable” and “credible” witness. He is so credible that his name is to remain secret so skeptics and debunkers won’t bother him with difficult questions. Call me skeptical but this sounds a lot like Randle/Bragalia are trying to avoid anybody talking to the guy and getting a completely different story. This “proves” nothing since Rowe’s story has been public for over a decade. Ignoring the possibility that his testimony is tainted by what has been in the media over the years is ignoring the lessons of past discredited witnesses. Randle also wrote that Kaufmann’s story was true because of all the other supporting testimony. How did that work out?

News Alert: Kevin Randle calls Professor Charles Moore a liar with bad information.
The idea that Professor Charles Moore has lied and deceived everyone has become part of Roswell mania. Kevin Randle, among others, has jumped onto the bandwagon to produce items that make it appear that Moore has gone out of his way to fabricate data and information. Randle recently attempted to call Moore a liar by stating he invented numbers for the range of the SCR-584 radar at White Sands in 1947. Well, Randle had gotten all his facts about this wrong. Did he get corrected by the throng of idolizing well-wishers on his blog? Amazingly, nobody said a word and, instead, they apparently accepted what he wrote as factual. I finally had to step in and point out that his accusation about the number being “invented” was completely false. Randle would later state that he had accepted the information from a “rabid believer”without any fact checking. I can hazard a guess to his source but we will just let that person enjoy the fact that Randle threw him under the bus. Didn’t that happen before?


Patrick Saunders: Roswell hero or Roswell joker?

Kevin Randle continues to peddle more Roswell stories in his blog. Another effort I noticed involved painting Patrick Saunders as a Roswell hero. Saunders had written some little cryptic notes in various Roswell books before he died. Randle had acquired one of these books about ten years ago. He discovered that in the flyleaf of The truth about the UFO crash at Roswell, Saunders had written that this was the truth and he hadn’t told anybody. Most of this book was based on the lies of Frank Kaufmann, Jim Ragsdale, and Glenn Dennis. How could this be the “truth”?
In Randle’s newest revelation, he produced a copy of UFO Crash at Roswell with the hand written note to his daughter state “You were there”. Who is “you”? Is he addressing his daughter? If so, how could she be there? The key to this mystery appears to be at the bottom of the page where he listed page numbers where his name was mentioned. The note is apparently a joke and he wanted everyone to see where he was mentioned. In this context it appears to be a little humor involved and indicates the other statement in The truth about the UFO crash at Roswell was probably also a joke. When you think about it, if he really wanted to tell the “truth”, wouldn’t he have just left us a book/document/diary outlining everything that would be released after he died? Instead, Roswell aficionados scan every fragment and innuendo as if they were the holy grail. Is this anything new? It has been over 60 years and we are still waiting for one piece of verifiable evidence that can demonstrate the “crash” really happened as claimed.


Repeat after me.......

Moving on, I noticed something in Randle’s blog as well as the other various commentaries about the greatest secret ever kept. Roswell proponents like to repeat the same lines over and over again like a religious mantra. For instance, I have seen Randle keep repeating over and over that flight number four was “canceled” and that it is “mythical”. Christopher Allen correctly pointed out to him that even if flight number four was “canceled” , Crary’s journal mentions a “cluster of balloons” was eventually launched on the fourth of June, 1947. One can call this “Flight no. 4” without being wrong since it was sent up with a sonobouy to test reception. Randle’s exercise is just a way to reinforce the idea that there were no balloons trains launched that were never found, which would eliminate MOGUL as the source of the Foster Ranch debris.
Proponents continue this little charade with the ML-307 radar reflectors used by the NYU team. They attempt to tell everybody that the flight did not have ML-307s because Crary’s entry does not mention them. Again, Allen has correctly noted that the journal was not an accurate/official record of what was being flown. The team had used the reflectors on flight no. 2 only two months prior so the possibility exists they were attached. It is not unreasonable to suggest that this flight, even it were not an official NYU flight, might include the reflectors to see how well they performed in conjunction with the radar at Alamogordo. The repetition exercise performed by proponents is used to reinforce the idea that ML-307s could not have been attached to the “cluster of balloons”.David Rudiak has also taken great effort to repeat the same idea over and over that Moore’s calculations were incorrect and then produced what he believes is the correct path of the flight that day. What is missed in all of this is that Moore’s effort was trying to show how the flight could have made it to the ranch. Rudiak is trying to imply that Moore’s flight could NEVER have reached the ranch. This is another exercise to eliminate the June 4th flight as a source of the materials described by Brazel. Despite Rudiak’s protestations, there remains a possibility that the flight could have made it to the ranch. Rudiaks’ work has been effective. I have seen several proponents parrot that the flight COULD NEVER have made it to the ranch based on what he has written.
You won’t read on any of the proponents web sites or blogs that there is the possibility this “cluster of balloons” could have had ML-307s attached and might have made it to Foster Ranch. To suggest it is possible is...well...sacrilegious.

UFO Truthseeker gets his FACTS wrong but takes skeptics to task anyway.
Dave Thomas, the president of the New Mexicans for Science and Reasoning (NMSR), has written numerous skeptical articles about Roswell. One of the most significant was his 1995 article for the Skeptical Inquirer describing project MOGUL. Recently, UFO truthseeker Dennis Balthasar discovered this article next to another in the “X” Chronicle Newspaper. Apparently, Balthasar never read either article before and he decided to go after Thomas. However, the first article had come from Robert Carroll’s Skeptic dictionary website and had not been written by Thomas at all. Therefore, Balthasar had got a FACT wrong (the author of the article) before he even started his diatribe about skeptics getting FACTS wrong.

The “Truthseeker” starts off his rebuttal by defining what a FACT is. FACTS are things that actually exist or are known to have happened. Balthasar’s argument is that skeptics never get their FACTS right before writing about Roswell. He found some points that, in some cases were erroneous (i.e. Dee Proctor being listed as a girl) or were out of date (One of the town’s UFO museums has now closed). However, Balthasar seemed to “pad” the amount of errors he could list by mentioning that Carroll did not spell “Mac” Brazel’s nickname correctly! It is interesting to note that the recent Roswell dig diaries (Doleman, Schmitt and Carey) and Roswell Encyclopedia (Randle) spelled it as “Mack” . Even more amusing is that Balthasar spelled it as “Mack” in his August 1st, 2003 editorial on his website! If the UFOlogists are going to spell it wrong, I can’t see why it is important to note that a skeptic misspelled it. Maybe there is a double standard in UFOlogy when it comes to misspelling nicknames. To feel this was important enough tomention demonstrates Balthasar is trying really hard to paint a certain picture.
When Balthasar did attack the points raised by Thomas he repeated two of the standard mantra lines already discussed:
1. Flight number 4 was canceled
2. David Rudiak has demonstrated that the balloons launched on 4 June could never have made it to the ranch.
As I have stated previously, neither of these statements are exactly accurate, which means he got his FACTS about this wrong as well.
The “Truthseeker” then spent time trying to point out that there is no MOGUL debris in the photographs other than weather balloons and radar reflector. To Balthasar, this apparently meant the debris could not have come from a project MOGUL balloon train. Balthasar can’t get his FACTS regarding this right either. It is well known that Marcel stated that the media did not see all the debris and complained a great more debris was still on the plane! Additionally, Balthasar wonders what is in an unopened box in the photographs? Maybe, just maybe, it might just contain some of those parts from the MOGUL balloon train.

Balthasar also gets some more FACTS wrong when he repeats the standard Roswell crashed spaceship time line. According to him, the only time the 14th of June recovery date was mentioned was in the Roswell Daily Record interview. He missed the Frank Joyce teletypes where Wilcox stated Brazel had found it three weeks ago. He also had not read the Fort Worth newspaper, where Jesse Marcel Sr is quoted repeating the same time period. Balthasar choice of FACTS seems highly selective.
Another mistake was the “Truthseeker’s” conviction that Mac Brazel came into town on the 6th of July with debris in hand. Apparently, he ignored the teletypes presented by Frank Joyce where it stated he came in on the 7th and that nobody had seen the debris. There wasalso the comments made in the Fort Worth paper and Roswell Daily Dispatch, which also described his arrival on the 7th. Jesse Marcel Sr. even stated in The Roswell Incident that Brazel had come in on a Monday! As for the debris that supposedly came into town with him, nobody seems to report seeing that debris in any if the articles from 1947. Bill Brazel even stated in 1997 that his father did not bring any material into town. Even though it is part of the accepted story that he brought the debris into town does not make it a FACT.
In an unrelated argument he twists FACTS around when he states the Soviets did not start any nuclear testing until 1949 in order to make it sound like project MOGUL was not needed to detect Soviet explosions in 1947! 1949 is when the Soviets performed their first successful nuclear explosion but not when they began their nuclear program. The US was quite aware that the Soviets could construct a bomb and they did not want to be unaware of it’s development. MOGUL was one of the programs under development in 1947 to detect such an explosion. It would be stupid to develop such a program after they already executed a test.Balthasar’s motto appears to be always to tell the truth so you don’t have to remember anything. Maybe Balthasar should start looking some information up and not relying upon memory to write articles. Many of the items that Balthasar considers to be FACTS are not. It may be a FACT that somebody stated something. However, it does not make what they state is true. They are just stories that are blindly accepted as FACTS.
Dave Thomas has his own commentary about this on the NMSR website. He mirrors my comments here and adds that Stanton Friedman, who verified all the FACTS in Balthasar’s piece, failed to conduct an adequate review. Thomas notes, “Sadly, things like this happen all too often in the world of UFOlogy.”

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Jesse Marcel- The Evolution of a Roswell Witness

Of course, the main period in Jesse’s life we are interested in is the second week of July, 1947. When he was sent out to meet Mac Brazel in Roswell, he obviously had no way of knowing that his name would be forever etched in the annals of UFO history. But as important as that week would later prove to be for Jesse, it is certain elements of his biography he later related to UFO investigators that have become so interesting.

When Jesse Marcel Sr. was interviewed about his recovery of the “crashed flying disk” by Bill Moore (who co-authored “The Roswell Incident”) and then by Bob Pratt (who was at the time a reporter for the National Enquirer), he was also asked about his personal accomplishments and his wartime experiences. Questions like these are common—not only to provide a background of the interviewee, but to establish his credibility.
Jesse’s bio, as he told it, was pretty impressive: Well educated with a degree in Physics, a certified, decorated war hero who shot down 5 enemy planes, a former personal aide to General Hap Arnold, a pilot (with 3000 hours behind the stick)… Jesse was indeed a “highly credible” witness. Moore and Charles Berlitz, co-authors of “The Roswell Incident”, naturally treated Marcel as a hero in the first book to be published about the case.
However, over the next fifteen years, Jesse’s testimony gradually became one of the more curious facets of the Roswell Saga. On one hand, he and his story were, in some sense, revered, as it was his account of the recovery of debris he described as “not of this world” that first put the Roswell Incident on the UFO map. His credibility at the time was not questioned, but as other witnesses stepped forward with their far more exciting versions of events, it became clear that for many of the Storytellers, Jesse Marcel’s tale was starting to lose its luster.
There was Glenn Dennis, and his story of a request for child-sized coffins, a red-headed Captain and what “the Nurse” saw. Nextthere was Jim Ragsdale’s story of his tryst in the desert with Trudy Truelove that led to his discovery of the crashed saucer, several aliens, and massive recovery teams. These two became the focus of the book “UFO Crash at Roswell” (Randle/Schmitt). Then special agent Frank Kaufmann became the primary witness in “The Truth About the UFO Crash at Roswell” (Randle/Schmitt), because of his heroic tale of tracking the UFO by Radar, seeing the ship “explode” on the radar screen, and his role in the recovery of the ship and its alien crew. And, of course, we have Gerald Anderson’s memories as a 6 year old finding a saucer and its alien crew and the third-hand tales of Barney Barnett providing most the excitement in “Crash at Corona” (Friedman).
In all of these books, Marcel’s story was not only relegated to the “back bench”, but many of his descriptions of events and the debris were flatly contradicted by others. Even more interesting is that the Storytellers all clearly preferred the other versions over Marcel’s:

Marcel’s clearly described wooden • “members” became metal beams, then “ Metal I-Beams”. (“...but it didn’t look like metal. It looked more like wood.” --Pratt Interview)
Marcel’s observation that it was clear • that the craft must have “exploded in the air” because there were no signs on the ground of any impact, has now been supplanted by a “huge gouge” made by the craft as it crashed. (“One thing I did notice – nothing actually hit the ground bounced on the ground. It was something that must have exploded above ground and fell.” --Pratt Interview)
Jesse related that he and Sheridan • Cavitt picked up what they could fit into their vehicles, and claimed that they left behind a lot more. What they brought back was the debris that was sent to Ft. Worth to be inspected by General Ramey. However, he never mentioned any kind of massive, HighHutchinsonSecurity effort to recover what they left behind, nor did he mention any additional “plane loads” of debris flown out of the base-- all of which are now accepted by the Storytellers as “facts”. As the Group Intelligence Officer, these are activities that he would have been very aware of.
Marcel’s early assertions that the • pictures of him taken in General Ramey’s office showed the real debris that he brought in, were ignored in favor of the claims made by other witnesses that the real wreckage was switched out as part of the cover-up conspiracy. “UFOs Are Real” -- Television Documentary, 1981
Marcel never mentioned any aliens-- • dead or alive. Not at the crash site OR on the base. Yet the Storytellers, based on accounts from others, are all in agreement that bodies were recovered, autopsied on base, and eventually shipped to …. somewhere else.
Jesse never mentioned or gave any • hint that the base was under any kind of unusual security alert. But the prevailing story, as related by other witnesses, is that the entire base was under locked-down Very Highest Security.
The authors of the Roswell books in the ‘90s clearly preferred these new, more exciting tales over Marcel’s. So without explicitly saying that Marcel’s story and descriptions were suspect, they simply related, then ignored many of the details of his story, thus relegating Jesse to more of a historical footnote than a pivotal witness.

Jesse Marcel’s Military Records
In 1995, not long after publication of the Randle/Schmitt book “The Truth about the UFO Crash at Roswell”, another researcher—Robert Todd—successfully acquired Jesse Marcel’s military records via a Freedom Of Information Act request, and suddenly the appellation of “a highly credible witness” was brought into question. Many began to ask; If Jesse was inclined to embellish the reality of his wartime “heroics” and his education, was he equally cavalier with his story of the “flying disk”?
Marcel’s records showed that contrary to the background he gave to the early researchers, he was not and never had been a pilot, nor was he a college graduate, and he never served as an aide to General Hap Arnold. He did receive two Air Medals, but not five, and they were not awarded for shooting down enemy airplanes-- there is no indication that he shot down even one. In the eyes of many, Marcel’s tale of the Flying Disk that was “not of this world” started to look a little suspect.
Meanwhile, disaster was falling on all of the most coveted Roswell witnesses. Gerry Anderson was caught fabricating documents and a diary, and lying about the “archaeologist”… Jim Ragsdale, whose stories were suspiciously increasing in dramatic content with each retelling, abruptly changed the location of his crash site some 70 miles away... The diary of Barney Barnett’s wife showed conclusively that he was nowhere near the Plains of San Agustin during that critical week… Glenn Dennis’s mysterious nurse apparently never existed, and many of his details were found to be misplaced memories from other times.
Then finally, Frank Kaufmann’s widow allowed researchers access to his papers after his death. These papers convincingly showed that Frank had forged the documentation he had shown to the storytellers, and that he was nothing more than an accomplished fabricator of his role in the Roswell Saga.
The Storytellers now found themselves without all of their best Witnesses. Huge holes had been ripped from their published stories, and it became clear that a renewed effort was required to try and resurrect the Saga from certain ruin.

Re-enter Major Jesse Marcel.
With the loss of their most exciting witnesses, long time crash advocates and Roswell researchers like Kevin Randlebecame desperate for a new headliner. So despite the obvious problems dealing with Marcel’s discredited stories of his military service, and because they apparently have no one better, they have gone back to the witness that started the whole saga. Today, Jesse is once again being promoted as a Key Witness.
However, this resurrection effort continues to ignore the very real problems that have plagued Marcel’s testimony since 1989. There are still these enormous discrepancies between Marcel’s comparatively sedate tale, and the far more exciting stories of massive clean up operations, a huge gouge, alien bodies, a base locked down on high security alert, plane-loads (or truck-loads) of alien ship debris, specialists being flown in from Washington DC, Colorado, California… all of which have to be addressed by anyone who seriously wants to try and understand Roswell.

Jesse’s War:
So if Jesse’s tale of his war-time exploits and education got a little “enhancement” 35 years later, just what is the reality of his time in service?
His service records indicate the Jesse fought the war well, but not exceptionally well. Every indication is that Jesse performed his wartime duties competently and was not shy about taking some risks—while in the Pacific Theater, he was promoted twice, and awarded two Air Medals and the Bronze Star. The records make absolutely no mention of him taking over a gun and shooting down a plane (let alone five planes!). Nor is there any mention what-so-ever of him as a pilot--which, considering the branch of service he was in, would be a decidedly noteworthy item. Gen. Ramey even noted in an evaluation of Marcel that his lack of pilot credentials would hurt his chances of advancement in the Air Force.
The common criticism voiced in his Efficiency Evaluations for ’43-‘45 was that he lacked in leadership and was deficient in his “personal appearance”. However, praises for his abilities as an Intelligence Officer, his attention to detail and his work ethic, overshadowed those shortcomings. His rating officers were all in agreement that Jesse was of value to the military, recommending that the Army Air Force retain his services and advance him in rank and duties. It is worth noting here that none of his wartime efficiency reports gave him an overall rating as “exceptional” or “superior”.
His post-war Efficiency Ratings through 1948 followed the same pattern— lacking in leadership, personal appearance and initiative, but skilled in his job with a good work ethic. He received written commendations for his work during “Operation Crossroads” and recommendations for advancement. Interestingly, in two Efficiency Reports completed during his time with the 509th, Jesse was ranked last or second-to-last by the report author (Col. Blanchard was one) when asked to compare him to the other officers in his command.
It wasn’t until his period with SAC that deficiencies in personal appearance stopped appearing in the reports- apparently it had been explained to him just how important it was to be “squared away” when you worked at the Pentagon.
Overall, Jesse’s record with the Army (and the post-split Air Force) could be rated as Good to Very Good, but not Superior. He was never in trouble, did his job well, and generally pleased his superiors, but showed little in the way of Leadership abilities. The Army thought enough of him that he was not let go during the post war demobilization that saw a huge proportion of the troops sent home, and until his mother’s illness intervened, he seemed to be well on his way to a comfortable career as a military bureaucrat.

Today:
Ever since Marcel’s military records were acquired, there have been periodic “discussions” between crash advocates and skeptics over the validity and the importance of what Marcel said in those interviews. A tape of Bill Moore’s interview has never surfaced, and neither has any from Stanton Friedman’s sessions. However, Bob Pratt did give copy of his interview tape to Karl Pflock, who published a transcription. It is from this transcription, and the quotes Moore published in “The Roswell Incident”, that we get Jesse’senhanced version of how he fought the war.
As I write this (February 2009), there is a renewed battle being waged on the Internet and in a book by Jesse Marcel Jr., to again try to resurrect Maj. Marcel’s Credibility from the disaster wrought by the reality of his military records. Tactics such as excusing his grandiose tales as “résumé building”, or “kill the messenger” (in this case, Bob Todd), and “please cut him some slack” are being used to try and elevate Jesse’s story from the quagmire his fanciful exaggerations created.
At the same time, The Storytellers seem loathe to give up the exciting stories of alien bodies, high security alerts and the plane loads of debris that their now discredited witnesses had brought to the Saga. As a result, the argument over Jesse’s credibility continues to ignore the huge gulf between his version of The Incident, and the versions that The Storytellers are actually selling.
Thanks to Bruce Hutchinson for sharing this article with everyone. You can find it at the new website, the Aerial Anomalies Research Exchange. It looks like it is website worth watching for new and informative articles about researching UFOs.

The Roswell Incident has emerged as a myth of such power and allure that it is no longer in anybody’s best interests to seek - or admit - the truth. The town of Roswell profits from increased tourism. The supposed Roswell ‘witnesses’ get their two hours of fame, and immortality in the history books. The Roswell ‘investigators’ garner the adulation of their peers (assuming they have any), and the royalties from book and movie deals. The UFO ‘organizations’ enjoy a new respectability they otherwise haven’t been able to achieve after nearly fifty years of worthless ‘research’... Is it any wonder the truth has been lost in this hodgepodge of vested interests? -
Robert Todd
Kowflop Quarterly December 8, 1995.

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THE GREATEST SECRET NEVER KEPT

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It has always been part of UFOlogy’s belief that the proof of alien visitation existed and the government was concealing this great secret. By the 1970s, it had become commonly accepted that the government was concealing all sorts of secrets. So when the Roswell story broke, it was not unexpected that part of the story would include a cabal that would go to enormous lengths to cover-up what transpired. For some reason, their ability to silence people failed when it came to Jesse Marcel.
Jesse Marcel stated that he first heard about it when he got a phone call from the sheriff’s office. One would think if there had been a crashed spaceship found prior to this and base activity significantly increased, Jesse would have known because of his position. Instead, he reports that Colonel Blanchard sent only Sheridan Cavitt and himself out to the ranch. What he discovered there was so secret that Jesse stopped by his home on the way back so his wife and son could examine it. He did not seemed to be concerned for security until a day later, when he would then tell his son not to talk about it. Jesse would later add that he never received direction about how secret the event really was but he knew he was not supposed to talk about it.
This is the way things were for thirty years. Most people in the world knew nothing about a crashed spaceship recovery. Even Presidents were kept in the dark about it. Meanwhile, the people in Roswell were scared into silence by the gestapo-like tactics employed by the Military Police of Roswell Army Air Field under the command of Major Edwin Easley. Easley, according to the story told today, ensured that nobody was going to talk by selecting brutish MPs that could intimidate children and their parents as well as the men in town. By threatening their families, they assured nobody was ever going to talk. Major Edwin Easley’s diabolical actions ensured the greatest secret ever kept would not be revealed by anybody who was there.Easley’s and the governments reach apparently did not extend into Louisianna. There, Jesse Marcel Sr. told all of his friends about how he helped recover a crashed UFO back in 1947. Apparently, he either forgot his security oath or felt that nobody was going to harm him or his family. The greatest secret ever kept was going to be revealed through casual conversation with friends who could spread the word to anyone they met. This is how the Roswell story broke and the rest is history.
The special group designated for keeping the greatest secret apparently became complacent. Otherwise, they would have been paying close attention to Jesse Marcel. The secret could have been kept had they simply jetted down to Louisianna and forced Jesse to keep quiet the instant he began to tell his story to friends who did not need to know. Instead, the greatest secret ever kept was allowed to appear in print without even a hint of concern. It was almost as if nobody really cared.
As the years passed, a parade of witnesses appeared to talk about the events of that July. Easley’s stranglehold on the town of Roswell had been released. The cabal, who dropped the ball by not eliminating the threat Marcel posed, now had to go into damage control. They would plant information in the archives that others could find indicating a more mundane solution. They would secretly encourage or pay individuals to hide the greatest secret never kept. The greatest secret never kept would be allowed to appear as nothing more than a balloon project run by a bunch idiot college boys, who would later try and claim they were the cause of the Roswell debris.
The greatest secret never kept can now be told thanks to Jesse Marcel Sr. In 1947, he was just a bumbling Major, who goofed. By the 1970s, while others cowered, Jesse stood tall and told the real story about Roswell. Today, he is almost like a demi-god, who is incapable of fault. The shrine in Roswell is a testament to Jesse Marcel’s courage in exposing “the greatest secret never kept”.

Bruce Hutchinson

Quelle: Sunlite 1/2009


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