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Raumfahrt - Mini-Satelliten-Experiment bei der ISS

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Sunita Williams and Yuri Malenchenko
ISS033-E-008165 (28 Sept. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander; and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, flight engineer, work with camera equipment in the International Space Station’s Zvezda Service Module.
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Yuri Malenchenko and Aki Hoshide
ISS033-E-008178 (28 Sept. 2012) --- In the Zvezda Service Module, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko (foreground) and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, both Expedition 33 flight engineers, monitor the undocking of the European Space Agency's "Edoardo Amaldi" Automated Transfer Vehicle-3 (ATV-3) from the International Space Station.
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Yuri Malenchenko
ISS033-E-008108 (28 Sept. 2012) --- In the International Space Station’s Zvezda Service Module, Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, Expedition 33 flight engineer, uses a computer during an onboard training session for the standard Soyuz emergency descent drill, a regular procedure for each station crew.
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Sunita Williams and Yuri Malenchenko
ISS033-E-008135 (28 Sept. 2012) --- In the International Space Station’s Zvezda Service Module, NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander; and Russian cosmonaut Yuri Malenchenko, flight engineer, participate in an onboard training session for the standard Soyuz emergency descent drill, a regular procedure for each station crew
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Commander Suni Williams Inspects Filters
ISS033-E-009199 (3 Oct. 2012) --- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams, Expedition 33 commander, conducts the continuing preventive inspection and cleaning of accessible Atmosphere Revitalization (AR) system bacteria filters in the Tranquility node of the International Space Station.
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Small Satellite Orbital Deployer
ISS033-E-009269 (4 Oct. 2012) --- A Small Satellite Orbital Deployer (SSOD) attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. Several tiny satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using the SSOD on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite deployment gear inside the 
lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment.
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Tiny Satellites Leave Station
ISS033-E-009286 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite 
deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment. A portion of the station's solar array panels and a blue and white part of Earth provide the backdrop for the scene.
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Tiny Satellites Leave Station
ISS033-E-009458 (4 Oct. 2012) --- Several tiny satellites are featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 33 crew member on the International Space Station. The satellites were released outside the Kibo laboratory using a Small Satellite Orbital Deployer attached to the Japanese module's robotic arm on Oct. 4, 2012. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Aki Hoshide, flight engineer, set up the satellite 
deployment gear inside the lab and placed it in the Kibo airlock. The Japanese robotic arm then grappled the deployment system and its satellites from the airlock for deployment.
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Quelle: NASA
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Satellite swarm released from ISS

Kyodo

Five small satellites were released from the International Space Station from late Thursday night to early Friday morning Japan time in the first such experiment to employ a robotic arm, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency said.

 

Three Japanese-made and two U.S.-made satellites were sent out. Releasing satellites from the ISS results in less vibration than direct launches on rockets, helping to reduce design and production costs, according to JAXA.

The experiment involving Japan's Kibo lab used satellites provided by such entities as the Fukuoka Institute of Technology, Tohoku University and Wakayama University. It was conducted in two parts. The first part involved astronaut Akihiko Hoshide, who has been on the ISS since July.

After being released into orbit, the satellites will carry out various missions, including taking pictures of Earth and sending Morse code messages to the ground with a high-power light-emitting diode, for about 100 days, JAXA said.

At the Fukuoka Institute of Technology, students involved in the development of the FITSAT1 satellite shouted for joy after its successful release. "We are relieved," said Professor Takushi Tanaka, who led the development team. "It's out in space without a hitch."

The team will conduct the world's first experiment next month to send a Morse code message from space to Earth via a flashing light visible through binoculars.

The team said it has received requests from Britain, Brazil and elsewhere, including one to transmit from the sky over New York's Central Park.

Quelle. JAXA

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