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Raumfahrt - Erfolgreicher Start von VS-15 Soyuz mit 2 Galileo-Satelliten

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6.04.2016

Two satellites arrive for Arianespace’s next Galileo mission from French Guiana

 

The two Galileo satellites for Arianespace’s Flight VS15 Soyuz mission were delivered by a 747 cargo jetliner that touched down March 5 at Félix Eboué Airport in French Guiana.
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The next pair of Galileo satellites to be orbited by Arianespace for Europe’s global satellite navigation system have arrived in French Guiana, positioning them to be readied for a May liftoff aboard a Soyuz launcher from the Spaceport.
Arriving yesterday on a 747 cargo jetliner at Félix Eboué Airport – which is located southwest of French Guiana’s capital city, Cayenne – the satellites were then readied for transport by road to the Spaceport.
The upcoming medium-lift mission, designated Flight VS15 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system, is an addition to the company’s 2016 manifest and will loft  two FOC (Full Operational Capability) Galileo satellites.
Flight VS15 will precede Arianespace’s launch of four Galileo satellites during the fourth quarter of 2016, to be performed by a heavy-lift Ariane 5 ES vehicle. The six satellites deploying by these two missions will bring total spacecraft in the Galileo constellation to 18 by year-end.
Galileo’s FOC phase is being funded and managed by the European Commission, which has designated the European Space Agency as the system’s design and procurement agent.
Arianespace’s most recent mission at the service of Galileo was Flight VS13, which utilized a Soyuz launcher to loft two of the navigation satellites last December. Prime contractor OHB System in Bremen, Germany produces the Galileo FOC satellites.
Quelle: arianespace
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Update: 16.04.2016
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Two Galileo satellites are “fit” for their Arianespace Soyuz launch in May

The Galileo satellites for Arianespace’s Flight VS15 undergo their fit-check at the Spaceport.
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The next two spacecraft to join Europe’s Galileo global satellite navigation system have made their initial contact with launcher hardware at the Spaceport in French Guiana, continuing the preparations for their liftoff on an Arianespace Soyuz vehicle in May.
During activity in the Spaceport’s S1A clean room facility, both spacecraft completed the initial “fit check” process, in which they were installed on the dispenser system that will deploy them in orbit during the May 24 flight.
The two FOC (Full Operational Capability) Galileo satellites were then removed, enabling their continued preparation and fueling. Prime contractor OHB System in Bremen, Germany produces the Galileo FOC spacecraft.
Arianespace’s mission with Soyuz – designated Flight VS15 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system – is an addition to the company’s busy 2016 launch manifest, which foresees up to 12 launches with its medium-lift Soyuz, heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega vehicles.
Another Arianespace launch at the service of Galileo is planned this year, using an Ariane 5 ES vehicle to loft four additional Galileo satellites during the fourth quarter.  The six satellites deployed by Arianespace’s two missions in 2016 will bring total spacecraft in the Galileo constellation to 18 by year-end.
Quelle: arianespace
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Update: 6.05.2016
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Galileo satellites are fueled for Arianespace’s next Soyuz mission
Preparations for Arianespace’s upcoming mission have moved into the fueling phase for the two Galileo navigation satellites that will be orbited by a medium-lift Soyuz later this month from the Spaceport in French Guiana.
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Galileo satellites are fueled for Arianespace’s next Soyuz mission
Arianespace’s upcoming launch will loft this latest pair of Galileo satellites on May 23. Once in orbit, the spacecraft will join Europe’s global navigation system, which is designed to ensure European independence in applications for businesses and citizens.
Galileo’s FOC phase is funded and managed by the European Commission, which has designated the European Space Agency as the system’s design and procurement agent. Prime contractor OHB System in Bremen, Germany produces the Galileo FOC satellites.
This month’s dual Galileo payload mission is designated Flight VS15 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system. It will be the 15th liftoff of the workhorse launcher from French Guiana since Soyuz’ introduction at the Spaceport in 2011.
Flight VS15 is one of up to 12 Arianespace missions targeted for 2016 with the company’s launcher family of the medium-lift Soyuz, heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega. So far this year, Arianespace has performed three launches: two with Ariane 5, and one utilizing Soyuz.
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Galileo Flight Model no. 10, named “Danielė” after a Lithuanian student, is fueled at the Spaceport for Arianespace’s May 23 mission with Soyuz.
Quelle: arianespace
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Update: 11.05.2016
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Galileo 13 satellite fueled for May 24 lift-off

Preparations for Arianespace’s upcoming mission have moved into the fueling phase for the next two Galileo navigation satellites, Galileo 13 and 14. The satellites will be sent into orbit by a medium-lift Soyuz on May 24 from the Spaceport in French Guiana. 
As part of the process, the 13th in the series of Full Operational Capability (FOC) Galileo platforms (Galileo-FOC FM10) has been “topped off” in the Spaceport’s S3B payload preparation facility.
Galileo 13 is named for Lithuanian student Danielė — continuing the practice of designating Galileo spacecraft after youngsters who created space and aeronautics-related drawings that were selected by national juries in European Union member states.
Galileo’s FOC phase is funded and managed by the European Commission, which has designated the European Space Agency as the system’s design and procurement agent. Prime contractor OHB System in Bremen, Germany, produces the Galileo FOC satellites.
This month’s dual Galileo payload mission is designated Flight VS15 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system. It will be the 15th liftoff of the workhorse launcher from French Guiana since Soyuz’ introduction at the Spaceport in 2011.
Flight VS15 is one of up to 12 Arianespace missions targeted for 2016 with the company’s launcher family of the medium-lift Soyuz, heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega. So far this year, Arianespace has performed three launches: two with Ariane 5, and one utilizing Soyuz.
Quelle: GPS-WORLD
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Update: 12.05.2016
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Payload integration begins for Arianespace’s next Soyuz mission with Galileo spacecraft

In the photo series above, Galileo FOC satellite “Danielė” is moved into position, then integrated atop its payload dispenser during activity at the Spaceport’s S3B payload preparation facility.
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The first of two Galileo navigation satellites to be orbited on Arianespace’s May 24 Soyuz flight has been integrated on its payload dispenser system, marking a key step as preparations advance for this medium-lift mission from French Guiana.
Named “Danielė,” the spacecraft was installed this week during activity inside the Spaceport’s S3B payload preparation facility. It is to be joined on the dispenser system by the mission’s other passenger – “Alizée,” whose own installation is forthcoming – in a side-by-side arrangement.
The pair – each named after children who won a European Commission-organized painting competition in 2011 – are then to be mated atop Soyuz’ Fregat upper stage and encapsulated in the protective payload fairing. Prime contractor OHB System in Bremen, Germany produced the satellites, and their onboard payloads are supplied by UK-based Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) – which is 99-percent owned by Airbus Defence and Space.
“Danielė” and “Alizée” will become the 13th and 14th FOC (Full Operational Capability) spacecraft to join Europe’s Galileo navigation system – which was conceived to provide high-quality positioning, navigation and timing services under civilian control. Its FOC phase is managed and funded by the European Commission, with the European Space Agency (ESA) delegated as the design and procurement agent on the Commission’s behalf.
The May 24 flight is designed Flight VS15 and will be performed from the purpose-built ELS launch complex at Europe’s Spaceport – with Arianespace’s Soyuz carrying out a nearly 3-hour, 48-minute mission to place its Galileo passengers into a targeted circular orbit at an altitude of 23,522 km., inclined 57.394 degrees to the equator. Total payload lift performance is estimated at 1,599 kg.
Quelle: arianespace
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Update: 20.05.2016
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ESOC Mission control ready for next Galileo pair

A team of European mission control experts will be watching closely next week when two Galileo satellites are boosted into space, ready to shepherd the craft through the first critical days in orbit.

Galileo satellites 13 and 14 are scheduled to lift off at 08:48 GMT (10:48 CEST) on 24 May from Europe's Spaceport in French Guiana on top of an Arianespace Soyuz rocket.

This will be the seventh Galileo launch, and it will bring the number of satellites in space to 14. A total of 24 operational satellites and spares are planned in the Galileo navigation constellation.

The fiery ascent will last just over nine minutes, after which the Fregat upper stage will fire twice to place the satellites into their release orbit. About 3 hours and 48 minutes into flight, they will separate, marking the end of the rocket’s mission and the start of the critical early days for the pair.

It will then be up to a combined team from ESA and France’s CNES space agency to make contact, establish control and then see the craft through their initial, critical, activities. For this launch, they will work from a control room in ESOC, ESA’s control centre in Darmstadt, Germany.

Within the combined team, each position is paired with a counterpart from the other agency to provide three mixed shifts around the clock for the first nine days.
The team has conducted all the Galileo early operations alternately from ESOC or from the CNES control centre in Toulouse, France.
Entering the critical phase
“Once the satellites separate into free flight, the solar wings will deploy automatically, we’ll be waiting very anxiously for receipt of the first signals via the tracking station at Dongara, Australia, and Kerguelen Island, in the Indian Ocean,” says Liviu Stefanov, lead flight director from ESA.
“Once we have contact, we’ll begin health checks, and we’ll be particularly interested in verifying the satellite attitudes, communication status, that power is flowing from the array and that no part of either satellite is too warm,” says Christelle Crozat, the lead Spacecraft Operations Manager from ESA.
Each satellite is equipped with two 1 x 5 m solar wings, carrying more than 2500 state-of-the-art solar cells to generate power throughout the 12 year life.
The next major step will be pointing the new Galileos towards Earth.
The intense effort will continue through the first nine days, when the joint team will work around the clock to prepare the satellites for handover to the Galileo Control Centre near Munich, for routine operations, and ESA’s Redu Centre in Belgium, for detailed payload testing.
“In these nine days, we will make three manoeuvres with each satellite, when we fire the thrusters to get them into their ‘drift’ orbit before handover for commissioning,” says Hélène Cottet, co-flight director from CNES.
“We will play an active role again later on to program the fine positioning manoeuvres needed before final handover for routine operations.”
Training for space
Everyone involved in this Galileo launch has trained through many weeks of intense simulations, some conducted separately, at each of the agencies’ centres, and some together, at ESOC.
“Even if our training has become standard, the scenarios we face in each simulation are quite challenging. Overcoming such difficulties is actually the best final training, and today the entire team is up to speed for real operations,” says Remi Lapeyre, co-Spacecraft Operations Manager from CNES.
“This allows us to concentrate on preparing for unexpected situations, or on integrating lessons learnt from the most recent actual operations.”
Quad launch coming soon
The team are already looking ahead to the next Galileo launch, expected towards the end of the year, when four satellites will be boosted into orbit on a single, specially adapted Ariane 5 rocket.
It will deliver the four Galileos to above 23 000 km altitude, a few hundred kilometres lower than the one of the current dual-launch configuration.
“The quadruple launch will be a major change for the mission control team, as we will have to conduct the critical early orbit phase for the four satellites in parallel,” says Liviu.
“We will have to replan the timelines, configurations and settings that we use now. It will be a significant challenge, but having already taken 12 Galileo satellites safely into their final operational orbits, it’s nothing we can’t handle.”
Galileo is Europe’s civil global satellite navigation system. Galileo will allow users worldwide to know their exact position in time and space with great precision and reliability. Once complete, the Galileo system will consist of 24 operational satellites, a number of in-orbit spares, and the ground infrastructure to enable the provision of positioning, navigation and timing services.
The Galileo programme is funded and owned by the EU. The European Commission has the overall responsibility for the programme; it manages and oversees the implementation of all programme activities.
Galileo’s deployment, the design and development of the new generation of systems and the technical development of infrastructure are entrusted to ESA. The definition, development and in-orbit validation phases of the Galileo programme were carried out by ESA, and co-funded by ESA and the European Commission.
The European Global Navigation Satellite System Agency (GSA) is ensuring the uptake and security of Galileo. From 2017 Galileo operations and provision of Galileo services will be entrusted to the GSA.
Quelle: ESA
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Fregat is fueled in Arianespace’s FCube facility for Soyuz Flight VS15
At the Spaceport, the Fregat upper stage for Soyuz Flight VS15 is transferred by road from the FCube facility – where it was fueled – to the S3B clean room.
Arianespace’s new Spaceport processing facility has fueled another Fregat stage. This upper stage for the medium-lift Soyuz launcher will be used for the May 24 flight from French Guiana with two European Galileo navigation satellites.
Named the FCube (Fregat Fueling Facility), the purpose-built installation is utilized to “top off” Fregat upper stages during Soyuz launch campaigns at the Spaceport. In service since last year, the FCube supports Arianespace’s sustained launch pace – giving the company greater flexibility in managing its mission manifest, while also increasing launch capacity with Soyuz and its other launch vehicle family members: the heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega.
Fregat upper stages are produced by NPO Lavochkin, a company that is part of the Soyuz launcher’s Russian industrial team. Fregat serves as an autonomous upper stage enabling Soyuz to perform a full range of missions. During its processing in the FCube facility, Fregat was fueled with UDMH (unsymmetrical dimethyl hydrazine) and NTO (nitrogen tetroxide) storable propellants that are loaded into spherical tanks.
After its fueling in the FCube, the Fregat for Arianespace’s Flight VS15 was transferred by road to the Spaceport’s S3B clean room. At this facility, the upper stage will be integrated with passengers for this month’s Soyuz mission: the latest two Galileo Full Operational Capability (FOC) spacecraft for Europe’s satellite-based navigation system. This will create the “upper composite,” which is protected by a payload fairing during the initial phase of flight through the atmosphere.
Fregat Will Deliver The Galileo Satellites To A Circular Orbit
For Arianespace’s May 24 mission, Fregat will perform a first burn, followed by a 3-plus hour ballistic phase. The Fregat will ignite its engine again to reach the circular orbit for separation of the two Galileo spacecraft – which will enter Orbital Plane A of the navigation satellite constellation.
Galileo’s FOC phase is funded and managed by the European Commission, which has designated the European Space Agency as the system’s design and procurement agent. OHB System in Bremen, Germany, is prime contractor, producing the Galileo FOC satellites. The satellites’ navigation system is supplied by UK-based Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd (SSTL), which is 99% owned by Airbus Defence and Space.
Flight VS15 is one of up to 12 Arianespace missions targeted for 2016 with the company’s complete launcher family. So far this year, Arianespace has performed three launches: two with Ariane 5, and one utilizing Soyuz.
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Soyuz’ “upper composite” is ready for next week’s Arianespace dual-satellite Galileo mission
The payload assembly process is now complete for Arianespace’s medium-lift Soyuz flight on May 24 from French Guiana, which is to orbit the 13th and 14th Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites at the service of Europe’s Galileo navigation system.
Performed yesterday in the Spaceport’s S3B clean room facility, these preparations involved encapsulation of the two Galileo spacecraft and their dispenser system – which had been installed atop Soyuz’ Fregat upper stage the previous day. The encapsulation was carried out using a two-piece Soyuz-ST payload fairing, and was followed by the addition of mission logos.
This completed unit, called the “upper composite,” will be mated atop Soyuz after the workhorse vehicle’s rollout tomorrow from the MIK integration building – where launcher assembly is handled – to the ELS launch zone.
Soyuz’ Latest Mission For Europe
Scheduled for liftoff on May 24 at precisely 5:48:43 a.m. local time in French Guiana, Soyuz will carry out a nearly 3-hr., 48-min. mission from launch to separation of the two passengers.
Galileo is Europe’s initiative for satellite navigation. Its complete operational and ground structure will be deployed during the FOC phase, which is managed and funded by the European Commission, with the European Space Agency (ESA) delegated as the design and procurement agent on the Commission’s behalf.
Prime contractor OHB System in Bremen, Germany produced the satellites, and their onboard payloads are supplied by UK-based Surrey Satellite Technology Limited (SSTL) – which is 99-percent owned by Airbus Defence and Space.
Quelle: arianespace
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Update: 23.05.2016
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Startvorbereitung
Quelle: CNES
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Soyuz reaches the launch zone for next week’s Arianespace mission with Galileo satellites

Soyuz is raised to a vertical position over its launch pad at the Spaceport, to be secured in place by the four support arms.
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Arianespace’s medium-lift Soyuz is “standing tall” in French Guiana – and ready for payload integration – following its transfer to the workhorse vehicle’s dedicated Spaceport launch complex earlier today.
With this rollout and the basic three-stage vehicle’s subsequent vertical positioning over its launch pad, Soyuz marked another key step toward Arianespace’s May 24 mission – which is to orbit the latest two FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites for Europe’s Galileo space-based navigation system.
In procedures that have become familiar at the Spaceport, Soyuz was moved via a transport/erector rail car in a horizontal-transfer process from the MIK launcher assembly facility to the ELS launch zone. Once over the launch pad, the vehicle was erected into a vertical orientation, where it is suspended in place by four large support arms.
Following this step’s completion, the mobile gantry was moved into position over the launcher – providing protection for the upcoming installation of Soyuz’ “upper composite,” which consists of the Galileo spacecraft and their dispenser system, plus the Fregat upper stage and payload fairing.
Supporting Europe’s Galileo Program
The May 24 flight’s two passengers – built by OHB System, with Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. supplying their navigation payloads – are the 13th and 14th FOC satellites in the Galileo program, which is creating a European-operated space-based navigation system.
Galileo’s FOC phase – during which the network’s complete operational and ground infrastructure will be deployed – is managed and funded by the European Commission. The European Space Agency has been delegated as the design and procurement agent on the Commission’s behalf.
Designated VS15 in Arianespace’s numbering system, next week’s mission is scheduled to lift off at precisely 5:48:43 a.m. a.m. local time in French Guiana, with its Galileo satellite passengers to be deployed into a targeted circular orbit during a flight lasting approximately 3 hrs., 47 min.
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Arianespace’s Soyuz is approved for its early morning liftoff on May 24
The Arianespace Soyuz mission that will further expand Europe’s Galileo satellite navigation constellation has been authorized for tomorrow’s launch from the Spaceport in French Guiana.
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Soyuz has been cleared for Arianespace’s May 24 liftoff with the latest two Galileo FOC (Full Operational Capability) satellites, which are contained in the “upper composite” – shown here during its integration atop the launcher.
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Approval for the early morning liftoff was given at the conclusion of today’s Launch Readiness Review, which verified the “go” status of Soyuz, its two Galileo satellite passengers, the Spaceport’s infrastructure and the network of downrange tracking stations.
The May 24 mission – designated VS15 in Arianespace’s numbering system – will be performed from the Spaceport’s purpose-built ELS launch facility for Soyuz. Liftoff is scheduled at precisely 5:48:43 a.m. local time in French Guiana, with the two Galileo spacecraft to be deployed during a flight sequence lasting approximately 3 hrs., 47 min.
Produced by OHB System, these relay platforms – which are the European constellation’s 13th and 14th satellites for launch – weigh an estimated 714 kg. each and will operate in medium-Earth orbit. Their navigation payloads were supplied by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd., which is 99-percent owned by Airbus Defence and Space.
The Galileo navigation system provides highly accurate global positioning services under civilian control. The European Commission is funding and managing its FOC (Full Operational Capability) phase, during which the network’s complete operational and ground infrastructure will be deployed; with the European Space Agency designated as the system’s design and procurement agent.
Tomorrow’s launch will be the 15th mission from French Guiana for Arianespace’s medium-lift Soyuz, as well as the company’s fourth flight in 2016 with its three-vehicle launcher family – which is completed by the heavy-lift Ariane 5 and lightweight Vega.
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Quelle: arianespace
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Update: 24.05.2016 / 6.45 MESZ
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Update: 16.00 MESZ
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Erfolgreicher Start von Soyuz VS-15
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Soyuz lifts off from French Guiana with two Galileo FOC spacecraft
Arianespace’s Soyuz launcher has begun its latest mission from the Spaceport, carrying two Full Operational Capability (FOC) satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation system.
Soyuz is to deploy its passengers on a flight lasting approximately 3 hrs., 48 min.
Payload lift performance for today’s mission – which is designated Flight VS15 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system – is estimated at 1,603 kg.
Galileo’s FOC phase is being funded and managed by the European Commission, which has designated the European Space Agency as the system’s design and procurement agent. The prime contractor for these two Galileo FOC satellites is OHB System, with their navigation payloads supplied by Surrey Satellite Technology Ltd. of the UK.
Quelle: arianespace
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