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Raumfahrt - Startvorbereitung für 17. SpaceX Falcon 9 Cargo Mission

16.03.2019

NASA Invites Media to 17th SpaceX Cargo Launch to Space Station

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Media accreditation now is open for the next SpaceX delivery of supplies, equipment and science investigations to the International Space Station.

 

A SpaceX Dragon cargo spacecraft is scheduled to launch no earlier than late April on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida on the company’s 17th Commercial Resupply Services contract mission for NASA. Media prelaunch and launch activities will take place at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center and neighboring CCAFS.

 

Media accreditation deadlines are as follows:

 

  • International media without U.S. citizenship must apply by 4:30 p.m. Thursday, March 21, for access to CCAFS, or by 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 7, for access to Kennedy media activities only.
  • U.S. media must apply by 4:30 p.m. Sunday, April 14.

 

All media accreditation requests should be submitted online at:

 

https://media.ksc.nasa.gov

 

For questions about accreditation, please email ksc-media-accreditat@mail.nasa.gov. For other questions, contact Kennedy’s newsroom at 321-867-2468.

 

The International Space Station is a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and enables research not possible on Earth. The space station has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, more than 230 people and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

Quelle: NASA

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Update: 16.04.2019

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Rocket Launch: April 26, 2019, 5:55 AM ET | SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-17

Apr 26, 2019 5:55 AM ET Kennedy Space Center LC-40SpaceX Falcon 9 CRS-17

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MISSION

A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket will launch a Cargo Dragon spacecraft to deliver the next shipment of supplies and equipment to the International Space Station. This is the 17th SpaceX mission under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract.


LAUNCH VIEWING

Witness liftoff from the main visitor complex (included with daily admission), or from viewing locations through NASA’s gates with a Launch Transportation Ticket (LTT), which may be purchased in addition to daily admission. At this time, no LTTs are available for this launch. If LTTs become available at a later date, tickets are announced and sold as soon as possible after a confirmed date and time is announced.

Quelle: KSC

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Update: 16.04.2019

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NASA Highlights Science on 17th SpaceX Resupply Mission to International Space Station

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Expedition 58 Flight Engineer Anne McClain of NASA is pictured in the cupola holding biomedical gear for the Marrow experiment. The study measures fat changes in the bone marrow before, and after exposure to microgravity. In addition, this investigation measures specific changes of red and white blood cell functions. Bone marrow fat is measured using magnetic resonance. Red blood cell function is measured with a breath sample analyzed with a gas chromatograph, and white blood cell function is studied through their genetic expression.
Credits: NASA

NASA will host a media teleconference at 11 a.m. EDT Monday, April 22, to discuss select science investigations launching on the next SpaceX commercial resupply flight to the International Space Station.

 

Audio of the teleconference will stream live online at: 

 

https://www.nasa.gov/live

 

SpaceX is targeting 5:55 a.m. Friday,April 26, for the launch of its Dragon spacecraft on a Falcon 9 rocket from Space Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida.

 

Participants in the briefing will be:

 

  • Annmarie Eldering, project scientist at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, who will discusshow the Orbiting Carbon Observatory-3 (OCO-3), to be installed on the Japanese Experiment Module-Exposed Facility of the orbiting laboratory, observes the complex dynamics of the Earth’s atmospheric carbon cycle.  
  • Gisela Detrell, head of the Life Support System research group at the Institute of Space Systems - University of Stuttgart, Germany, who will talk about Photobioreactor, an investigation aimed at demonstrating the use of biological processes to create a hybrid life support system. On future long-duration missions, this approach could reduce the amount of food, water, and other essentials that crews have to bring from Earth.
  • Lucie Low of the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences at the National Institutes of Health, who will discuss tissue chips, or organs-on-chips. Tissue chips model the detailed physical structure of human tissue using cells grown on an artificial scaffold, enabling higher-accuracy disease modeling and drug testing. 
  • Alan Grodzinsky of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, who will discuss his team’s tissue chip investigation that will study the effects of spaceflight on musculoskeletal disease biology.The goal of this research is to treat the root cause of post-traumatic osteoarthritis disease and prevent permanent joint damage, rather than mask the symptoms with painkillers later in life.

 

To participate in the teleconference, media must contact Joshua Finch at 202-358-1100 or joshua.a.finch@nasa.gov by 4 p.m. Friday, April 19, for dial-in information. 

 

SpaceX’s Dragon spacecraft also will carry crew supplies and hardware to the orbiting laboratory to support the Expedition 59 and 60 crews for the 17th mission under NASA’s Commercial Resupply Services contract.

 

The space station is a convergence of science, technology and human innovation that demonstrates new technologies and enables research not possible on Earth. The orbiting laboratory has been occupied continuously since November 2000. In that time, more than 230 people, and a variety of international and commercial spacecraft, have visited the orbiting laboratory. The space station remains the springboard to NASA's next great leap in exploration, including future missions to the Moon and eventually to Mars.

Quelle: NASA

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Update: 20.04.2019

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Space Coast's next launch – and landing – of SpaceX Falcon 9 delayed

The planned launch of a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral with supplies destined for the International Space Station has been pushed back to the last day of the month, NASA confirmed Friday.

Teams were targeting early next Friday, April 26, for liftoff from Launch Complex 40 with an uncrewed Dragon spacecraft, but NASA opted to push the mission back to 4:22 a.m. Tuesday, April 30. Launches to the ISS require instantaneous windows, so it must launch at that time or be delayed to another day.

Space Coast residents will get an early wake-up call that morning, too, when the rocket's 156-foot-tall first stage returns to land at the Cape's Landing Zone 1 and generate its signature triple sonic booms along the way. The booms are generally harmless to humans and infrastructure.

Packed into dragon and its "trunk" will be thousands of pounds of science experiments and supplies for the crew of the ISS. When it departs the station about a month later, it will return with scientific results and waste no longer needed on the station.

Quelle: Florida Today

 

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