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Raumfahrt - Erfolgreicher Start von H-IIA mit Global Changing Observation Mission - Climate SHIKISAI (GCOM-C)

22.12.2017

Launch Time and Window, H-IIA F37 (with upgraded function) Encapsulating SHIKISAI and TSUBAME

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Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.
National Research and Development Agency
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

MHI and JAXA set the launch time and window of H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 37 (with upgraded function) which carries aboard the Global Changing Observation Mission - Climate "SHIKISAI" (GCOM-C) and the Super Low Altitude Test Satellite "TSUBAME" (SLATS). Refer to the following details;

Launch Date:
December 23 (Sat.), 2017
Launch Time:
10:26:22 a.m. (Japan Standard Time, JST)
Launch Window:
10:26:22 a.m. through 10:48:22 a.m. (JST)
Reserved Launch Period:
December 24 (Sun.), 2017 through January 31 (Wed.), 2018
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Quelle: JAXA
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Update: 23.12.2017
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Successful Launch, H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 37 
Encapsulating SHIKISAI and TSUBAME

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December 23, 2017 (JST)

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd.
National Research and Development Agency
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd. and JAXA successfully launched H-IIA Launch Vehicle No. 37 (H-IIA F37) (with upgraded function) which encapsulates the Global Changing Observation Mission - Climate "SHIKISAI" (GCOM-C) and the Super Low Altitude Test Satellite "TSUBAME" (SLATS) at 10:26:22, 2017 (JST) from the JAXA Tanegashima Space Center. 
The launch and flight of H-IIA F37 proceeded as planned. So did the separation of SHIKISAI and TSUBAME, which was confirmed respectively at approximately 16 minutes and 13 seconds and 1 hour and 47 minutes 59 seconds after liftoff. 
We express sincere appreciation for all.

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Dec. 23, 2017 Updated

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SHIKISAI Solar Array Deployment – Images

The reception of telemetry data from JAXA's SHIKISAI satellite was made at 10:44 a.m. at the JAXA Mingenew Station, Australia, confirming SHIKISAI’s solar array deployment above Australia.

Images Captured by the SHIKISAI onboard Cameras Following Solar Array Deployment

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Solar array paddle 1 (Plus Y Side)

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Solar array paddle 2 (Minus Y Side)

Quelle: JAXA

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In a first for Japan, JAXA puts two satellites into orbit using one rocket

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An H-IIA rocket carrying two satellites lifts off Saturday from Tanegashima Space Center in Kagoshima Prefecture. One of the satellites will aid climate research and the other is meant for low-altitude tests. | KYODO

Japan placed two satellites into separate orbits with a single rocket on Saturday morning, achieving a feat it hopes will lead to cheaper launches in the future.

The H-IIA rocket took off from Tanegashima Space Center in Kagoshima Prefecture at 10:26 a.m., carrying a Shikisai climate research satellite and a low-altitude test satellite named Tsubame. The satellites will orbit at altitudes of 800 km and under 300 km, respectively.

The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), working in conjunction with Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., hopes the success will allow it to orbit multiple satellites using one rocket in the future. Until now, each JAXA satellite had been launched individually.

The H-IIA rocket released the Shikisai first before decelerating and dropping to an altitude of around 480 km to release the Tsubame.

Shikisai will travel on a path that will see it return to the same orbit after a certain period, allowing it to investigate changes in water circulation and the mechanisms involved in climate change over a set period.

Tsubame, driven by an ion engine that uses fuel more efficiently than gas jet propulsion, will maneuver into lower orbits of 300 km or below and be assessed for its ability to stably travel at low altitudes. At such altitudes, atmospheric resistance is about 1,000 times greater than that experienced by most observation satellites, which orbit at around 600 km to 800 km above Earth.

When Tsubame reaches an altitude of 270 km about 15 months later, a test will determine whether it can maintain that altitude using its thrusters, the goal being to have it gradually descend to an altitude of 180 km.

Orbits lower than 300 km remain underdeveloped for satellite use, according to JAXA.

Putting a satellite in a low orbit makes it possible to capture high-resolution images, among other potential functions. JAXA hopes to put such images to use during and after natural disasters.

Quelle: the japan times

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Update: 24.12.2017

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Completion of Critical Operations Phase, SHIKISAI and TSUBAME

December 24, 2017 (JST)

National Research and Development Agency
Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA)

JAXA received telemetry data from SHIKISAI and TSUBAME, confirming that their satellite attitude control system had transitioned to the steady state. Current status of both satellites is stable.
Subsequently, the following procedure occurred – power generation that supports the satellites’ operation by the deployed solar array wings, ground communications and sound attitude control that maintains those operations. Combined by the completion of the series of other operations, such as powering up of the bus and mission equipment, the satellites have entered the state where they can be sustained in orbit. This concludes their critical operations phase*¹.

SHIKISAI and TSUBAME will move on to the next operations phase*², where the functions of the satellites’ onboard apparatus will be examined approximately in the next three-month period.

JAXA conveys deep appreciation for the support by all for the satellites’ launch and tracking.

*¹ Critical operations phase: the phase that follows satellite’s separation from a launch vehicle, solar array deployment, and powering up of instruments for the satellite’s regular operations. The critical operations phase comes to an end at the start of the satellite’s control mode for nominal operation.

*² Next operations phase: during this phase, the entire satellite, its observation/mission sensors and other onboard equipment are scrutinized.

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SHIKISAI and TSUBAME critical operation phase successfully completed! Initial function verification starts!

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JAXA received telemetry data from SHIKISAI and TSUBAME, confirming that their satellite attitude control system had transitioned to the steady state. Current status of both satellites is stable.
Subsequently, the following procedure occurred - power generation that supports the satellites’ operation by the deployed solar array wings, ground communications and sound attitude control that maintains those operations. Combined by the completion of the series of other operations, such as powering up of the bus and mission equipment, the satellites have entered the state where they can be sustained in orbit. This concludes their critical operations phase.
SHIKISAI and TSUBAME will take about three months to verify the function of its onboard equipment and instruments in space.

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About Global Change Observation Mission - Climate "SHIKISAI" (GCOM-C)

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Forecasting future global climate

The purpose of the GCOM (Global Change Observation Mission) project is the global, long-term observation of Earth's environment. GCOM is expected to play an important role in monitoring both global water circulation and climate change, and examining the health of Earth from space. Global and long-term observations (10-15 years) by GCOM will contribute to an understanding of water circulation mechanisms and climate change.

GCOM consists of two satellite series, the GCOM-W and GCOM-C. The GCOM-C, carrying a SGLI (Second generation GLobal Imager), conducts surface and atmospheric measurements related to the carbon cycle and radiation budget, such as clouds, aerosols, ocean color, vegetation, and snow and ice.

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Characteristics of Global Change Observation Mission - Climate "SHIKISAI" (GCOM-C)

SGLI is an optical sensor for monitoring the long-term trends of aerosol-cloud interactions and for understanding the carbon cycle

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The Second generation GLobal Imager (SGLI) on GCOM-C1 is an optical sensor capable of multi-channel observation at wavelengths from near-UV to thermal infrared wavelengths (380nm to 12µm.) SGLI also has polarimetry and forward / backward observation functions at red and near infrared wavelengths. SGLI obtains global observation data once every 2 or 3 days, with resolutions of 250m to 1km.

The SGLI observations will improve our understanding of climate change mechanisms through long-term monitoring of aerosols and clouds, as well as vegetation and temperatures, in the land and ocean regions. These observations will also contribute to enhancing the prediction accuracy of future environmental changes by improving sub-processes in numerical climate models. SGLI-derived phytoplankton and aerosol distributions are also used for mapping fisheries and for monitoring the transport of yellow dust and/or wildfire smoke.

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Quelle: JAXA

 

 

 
 

 

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