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Donnerstag, 26. Januar 2017 - 17:45 Uhr

Raumfahrt-History - 1990 Space-Shuttle STS-32 Columbia Mission

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STS-32
 
 
Mission: SYNCOM IV-F5; LDEF Retrieval
Space Shuttle: Columbia
Launch Pad: 39A 
Launch Weight: 255,994 pounds
Launched: January 9, 1990, 7:35:00 a.m. EST
Landing Site: Edwards Air Force Base, Calif.
Landing: January 20, 1990, 1:35:36 a.m. PST
Landing Weight: 228,335 pounds
Runway: 22 
Rollout Distance: 10,096 feet
Rollout Time: 62 seconds
Revolution: 172
Mission Duration: 10 days, 21 hours, 0 minutes, 36 seconds
Returned to KSC: January 26, 1990
Orbit Altitude: 178 nautical miles
Orbit Inclination: 28.5 degrees
Miles Traveled: 4.5 million 

Crew Members

                   STS-32 Crew Photo

Image above: STS-32 Crew photo with Commander Daniel C. Brandenstein, Pilot James D. Wetherbee, Mission Specialists Bonnie J. DunbarG. David Low and Marsha S. Ivins. Image Credit: NASA 

Launch Highlights

STS-32 Mission PatchThe launch scheduled for December 18, 1989 was postponed to complete and verify modifications to Pad A, being used for first time since January 1986. The launch scheduled for January 8, 1990 scrubbed due to weather conditions.


Mission Highlights

Objectives were deployment of SYNCOM IV-F5 defense communications satellite and retrieval of NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). SYNCOM IV-F5 (also known as LEASAT 5) deployed first, and third stage Minuteman solid perigee kick motor propelled the satellite to geosynchronous orbit. LDEF was retrieved on flight day four using the remote manipulator system. Middeck payloads: Characterization of Neurospora Circadian Rhythms (CNCR); Protein Crystal Growth (PCG); Fluid Experiment Apparatus (FEA); American Flight Echocardiograph (AFE); Latitude /Longitude Locator (L3); Mesoscale Lightning Experiment (MLE); IMAX camera; and Air Force Maui Optical Site (AMOS) experiment.
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Five astronauts launched aboard the Space Shuttle Columbia on January 9, 1990 at 7:35:00am (EST) for the STS-32 mission. Pictured in their crew portrait, front left to right, are David C. Brandenstein, commander; and James D. Weatherbee, pilot. Pictured rear left to right are mission specialists Marsha S. Ivins, G. David Low, and Bonnie J. Dunbar. Primary objectives of the mission were the deployment of the SYNCOM IV-F5 defense communications satellite and the retrieval of NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF).
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STS-32 crewmembers pose for portrait in front of T-38As upon KSC arrival 
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The launch of STS-32 from Kennedy Space Center's pad 39A.
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The Syncom IV-F5 satellite is deployed.
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NASA's Long Duration Exposure Facility as seen during a photographic survey after it's retrieval by Columbia on mission STS-32. visible is the bay and town of Lüderitz in the top left corner.
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STS-32 :: Jan. 9-20, 1990

Pictured: Space shuttle Columbia sits atop the Shuttle Carrier Aircraft as they fly by the Vehicle Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). Space shuttle Columbia returned to KSC after a successful mission that involved deploying the SYNCOM IV-F5 defense communications satellite and retrieving NASA’s Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). STS-32 launched on Jan. 9 and was one of the longest shuttle missions at the time at 10 days. The crew members were Commander Daniel C. Brandenstein, Pilot James D. Wetherbee and Mission Specialists Bonnie J. Dunbar, G. David Low and Marsha S. Ivins. Columbia landed on Jan. 20 at Edwards Air Force Base.

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Frams von STS-32 Columbia Mission NASA-Video:

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Infrarot-Aufnahmen von Columbia-Nachtlandung

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Quelle: NASA

 


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