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Raumfahrt - Startvorbereitung von Ariane-V-VA-233 mit 4 Galileo Satelliten

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31.08.2016

The Spaceport is busy with activity for Arianespace’s upcoming missions

Launcher elements “from bottom to top” for Arianespace Flight VA233 with an Ariane 5 ES vehicle are shown during their unloading at Pariacabo Port in French Guiana for transfer to the Spaceport. They are (left to right): the main stage, the EPS upper stage, and Ariane 5’s payload fairing. Flight VA233 will orbit four Galileo satellites in November.

The diversity of Arianespace launch services available to commercial and institutional customers is underscored by the current mission preparations for flights that will orbit Earth observation platforms, telecommunications relay spacecraft and global navigation satellites from the Spaceport.

During the coming four months from French Guiana, these flights will deliver satellites of varying weights and sizes to:

  • Medium-Earth orbit for improved positioning and timing information in a European program;
  • Geostationary transfer orbit, providing advanced relay capacity for a leading U.S.-based telecommunications operator; and
  • Sun-synchronous orbit for high-resolution imaging with Peru’s first Earth observation satellite.

Ariane 5 comes ashore for its trip to medium-Earth orbit

As part of the ongoing activity, launcher components for Arianespace’s initial Ariane 5 mission carrying Galileo satellites arrived in French Guiana this week aboard the MN Colibri ship, completing a trans-Atlantic voyage from Europe.

Scheduled for liftoff in November, this Ariane 5 will carry a cluster of four European navigation system spacecraft, further expanding the Galileo constellation that has been created with satellites orbited in pairs by previous Arianespace missions using Soyuz launchers.

The MN Colibri roll-on/roll-off ship is unloaded at Pariacabo Port after arriving in French Guiana.

Among the components delivered by the MN Colibri were Ariane 5’s cryogenic core stage, its EPS storable propellant upper stage, and the payload fairing for Arianespace’s November mission – designated Flight VA233 in the company’s launcher family numbering system. These elements were unloaded at Pariacabo Port on the Kourou River for their transfer to the nearby Spaceport.

Flight VA233 will use an Ariane 5 ES version, which was flown on Arianespace launches in the past that deployed Europe’s 20,000-kg.-class ATV resupply vehicle into low-Earth orbit for rendezvous and docking with the International Space Station.

While Flight VA233’s lift performance will be significantly less than with the ATV – the four Galileo satellites have a liftoff mass of some 740 kg. each, plus 447 kg. for their dispenser system – the Ariane 5 will carry its payload to a much higher medium-Earth orbit altitude of approximately 23,200 km. To date, Arianespace has orbited 14 Galileo spacecraft on seven previous Soyuz missions; the most recent was conducted in May.

An Arianespace “double” mission to geostationary transfer orbit 

The Ariane 5 ECA launcher for Flight VA232 rolled out today to the Spaceport’s launch zone for liftoff tomorrow, August 24.

As Flight VA233 is ready to move into the preparation phase, another Ariane 5 mission enters its countdown as Flight VA232 is poised for launch tomorrow carrying a pair of Intelsat satellites.

This Ariane 5 ECA version was transferred today to the Spaceport’s ELA-3 launch zone. With a liftoff during a 45-minute launch window opening at 6:55 p.m. local time in French Guiana on August 24, Intelsat 33e and Intelsat 36 are to be deployed into geostationary transfer orbit during a 41-minute mission.

Flight VA232 marks Arianespace’s sixth launch so far in 2016, and the fourth since January utilizing an Ariane 5.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 10.09.2016

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Galileo quartet landing
 

FANTASTIC FOUR: NOVEMBER’S GALILEOS REACH EUROPE’S SPACEPORT

A transatlantic flight delivered four Galileo satellites to French Guiana on Tuesday, in preparation for a shared launch this November by Ariane 5 – the first for Europe’s satnav constellation.

The satellites’ odyssey began the previous day, when they left ESA’s technical centre in Noordwijk, the Netherlands, where every Galileo satellite is tested.

Each satellite was placed into protective containers before leaving the cleanroom environment of the test facility. These containers incorporate sophisticated environmental control, satellite monitoring systems and shock absorbers.

Galileo container unloaded

They were then driven by separate lorries to Luxembourg Findel Airport. On Tuesday morning they were flown by 747 aircraft to Cayenne–Félix Eboué Airport in French Guiana, touching down around 10:30 local time.

They were taken to the S1A payload preparation building of the Guiana Space Centre, to be unboxed the following day.

The building will remain their home as their launch campaign begins. The first activity is a ‘fit check’ with the dispenser that will release them into orbit from the rocket’s upper stage.

The modified Ariane 5 that will carry the four Galileos into orbit arrived in French Guiana a fortnight ago.

In development since 2012, this new variant has evolved from the Ariane 5 used to place ESA’s 20 tonne supply ferry for the International Space Station into low orbit.

This new version will carry a lighter payload – four fully fuelled 738 kg Galileo satellites plus their dispenser – but must take it up to the much higher altitude of 23 222 km.

Satellites leaving ESTEC

November’s launch is a major step up for Galileo. The 14 Galileo satellites already in orbit have been launched two at a time, by Soyuz from French Guiana.

Having 18 satellites in orbit should enable initial Galileo operational services to begin, a decision that will be taken by the European Commission, the system’s owner.

Two more Galileo launches by Ariane 5 are due in the next two years.

Quelle: ESA

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A quartet of Galileo satellites is prepared for launch on Ariane 5

The four spacecraft to be orbited on Arianespace’s first launch of Galileo navigation satellites by Ariane 5 have begun their processing at the Spaceport in preparation for a November liftoff from French Guiana.

One of four Galileo satellites for launch on Ariane Flight VA233 is removed from its protective shipping container

One of the four Galileo satellites for Flight VA233 is removed from its protective shipping container during activity inside the Spaceport’s S5 preparation facility.

This milestone mission – designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system – follows the company’s previous launches of Galileo spacecraft in pairs aboard medium-lift Soyuz vehicles.

Flight VA233 is to utilize an Ariane 5 ES version of the heavy-lift workhorse equipped with a storable propellant upper stage. The vehicle will deploy its satellite passengers at a targeted orbit altitude of 23,222 km.

All four spacecraft were delivered this week by a chartered Boeing 747 cargo jetliner, which touched down at Félix Eboué Airport near Cayenne. They were transported by road to the Spaceport’s S5 payload processing facility.

Arianespace launches Galileo for Europe

Galileo is Europe’s civil global satellite navigation system, providing positioning with great precision and reliability. The program is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission.

Design and development of the new generation of systems and the technical development of infrastructure are entrusted to the European Space Agency, while the Galileo spacecraft bus is built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, and the navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

To date, 14 Galileo satellites have been orbited by Arianespace Soyuz launchers on seven missions from French Guiana. With the inaugural Ariane 5 launch, this number will increase to 18. When complete, the Galileo system will consist of 24 operational satellites, along with the ground infrastructure for the provision of positioning, navigation and timing services.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 14.09.2016

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A check-out for four Galileo satellites to be orbited by Arianespace on Ariane 5

The four Galileo satellites for Arianespace’s first Ariane 5 mission at the service of Europe’s navigation system are coming together in their flight configuration. 

Preparations for a November Ariane 5 flight

Two of the four Galileo satellites for Arianespace’s November 17 Flight VA233 with Ariane 5 are installed on the dispenser system during fit-check activity at the Spaceport.

During pre-launch preparations in French Guiana at the Spaceport’s S1A processing facility, these spacecraft are undergoing fit checks with the new dispenser system to be installed on Ariane 5. 

This dispenser will secure the Galileo satellites in place during their ascent to a targeted release altitude of 23,222 km., then deploy them in rapid sequence using a pyrotechnic separation system.

The November 17 mission with the satellite quartet is designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s launcher family numbering system. It follows seven previous missions that orbited Galileo spacecraft in pairs using the company’s medium-lift Soyuz launcher.

Galileo satellites for Europe’s navigation services

Galileo is Europe’s civil global satellite navigation system for highly accurate positioning with great precision and reliability. The spacecraft are built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

Each of the Galileo satellites will have an estimated liftoff mass of 738 kg., while the dispenser – designed by Airbus Defence and Space – weighs in at 447 kg.

The Galileo program is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. Design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure has been assigned to the European Space Agency.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 1.10.2016

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Arianespace’s first Ariane 5 for Galileo takes shape at the Spaceport

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Initial integration steps for the Ariane 5 ES launcher to be used on Arianespace Flight VA233 are shown in this photo series. At left and center, the vehicle’s core stage is removed from its shipping container and transferred for positioning over a mobile launch table inside the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building. One of the two solid propellant boosters rolls out (at right) for mating to the core stage.

The initial Ariane 5 to loft four global positioning satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation system has begun its build-up at the Spaceport in French Guiana for a milestone Arianespace mission in November.

This launcher is an Ariane 5 ES version that began the integration process earlier in the week, with the cryogenic core stage’s positioning over a mobile launch pad, followed by integration of the vehicle’s two solid propellant boosters.

Designated as Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system, the mission’s Ariane 5 is being assembled inside the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building. Once completed under the direction of production prime contractor Airbus Safran Launchers, it will be moved into the Final Assembly Building where Arianespace takes responsibility for installation of the four Galileo spacecraft.

14 Galileo satellites launched by Arianespace…and counting

Arianespace already has orbited 14 Galileo spacecraft, all lofted in pairs on seven previous missions utilizing the company’s medium-lift Soyuz launcher – with the most recent conducted last May.

Europe’s Galileo navigation system provides highly accurate global positioning services under civilian control. The European Commission funds and manages its Full Operational Capability (FOC) phase, during which the network’s complete operational and ground infrastructure will be deployed; with the European Space Agency designated as the system’s design and procurement agent.

For its maiden Ariane 5 mission at the service of Galileo, Arianespace’s workhorse heavy-lift vehicle will be equipped with a dispenser system that secures the quartet of Galileo satellites in place during ascent, and deploys them in rapid sequence at a targeted release altitude of 23,222 km.

The four spacecraft were built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 12.10.2016

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Ariane 5 is ready to receive its first payload of Galileo satellites for launch by Arianespace

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Ariane 5’s vehicle equipment bay is hoisted in the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building for integration on Flight VA233’s Ariane 5 ES (photo at left), then lowered into position on the main cryogenic stage (at right).

The first Ariane 5 launcher to orbit Galileo navigation satellites has completed its initial build-up in French Guiana, continuing preparations for Arianespace’s November 17 mission from the Spaceport to deploy four more of the European-developed global positioning spacecraft.

During activity in the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building, this heavy-lift vehicle for Arianespace Flight VA233 underwent the assembly process that began by mating Ariane 5’s two solid propellant strap-on boosters with the main cryogenic stage.

The next step was integration of the launcher’s vehicle equipment bay as well as the installation of Ariane 5’s EPS storable propellant stage.

From launcher integration to final assembly

After completion of verifications and systems checkout by production prime contractor Airbus Safran Launchers, the Ariane 5 will be moved to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building – where Arianespace takes authority for payload integration and launch.

The EPS storable propellant upper stage is powered by a re-ignitable engine that operates with MMH and N2O4 propellants. It differentiates Flight VA233’s launcher from the Ariane 5 ECA versions, which have a cryogenic upper stage and are typically used on Arianespace missions to geostationary transfer orbits with telecommunications satellites.

For Flight VA233, the Ariane 5 ES will carry the quartet of Galileo satellites (weighing 738 kg. each) and their 447-kg. dispenser system to medium-Earth orbit, for deployment at an altitude of approximately 23,222 km.

Ariane 5’s first use to deploy Galileo satellites

The upcoming Ariane 5 launch will mark the initial utilization of Ariane 5 in deploying Galileo constellation satellites. Flight VA233 will continue Arianespace’s support of the global positioning satellite system, following seven missions performed with the company’s medium-lift Soyuz that carries a pair of Galileo spacecraft on each flight. Seven Soyuz missions have delivered a total of 14 navigation satellites into orbit since 2011.

Galileo is a key effort for Europe, offering highly accurate positioning with great precision and reliability via a civil global satellite navigation system. The program is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. Design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure has been assigned to the European Space Agency.

The spacecraft to be launched on Flight VA233 were built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom. Airbus Defence and Space developed the dispenser system that will carry and deploy the satellites from Ariane 5.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 13.10.2016

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Ariane 5 ready for first payload of Galileo satellites

The first Ariane 5 launcher to orbit Galileo navigation satellites has completed its initial build-up in French Guiana, continuing preparations for Arianespace’s Nov. 17 mission from the spaceport to deploy four more Galileo satellites, according to launch contractor.

The Ariane 5 vehicle equipment bay is shown being lowered into position on the main cryogenic stage in preparation for Flight VA233, the launch of four Galileo satellites. (Photo: Arianespace)

The Ariane 5 vehicle equipment bay is shown being lowered into position on the main cryogenic stage in preparation for Flight VA233, the launch of four Galileo satellites. (Photo: Arianespace)

During activity in the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building, the heavy-lift vehicle for Arianespace Flight VA233 underwent the assembly process that began by mating Ariane 5’s two solid propellant strap-on boosters with the main cryogenic stage.

The next step was integration of the launcher’s vehicle equipment bay as well as the installation of Ariane 5’s EPS storable propellant stage.

From launcher integration to final assembly

After completion of verifications and systems checkout by production prime contractor Airbus Safran Launchers, the Ariane 5 will be moved to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building — where Arianespace takes authority for payload integration and launch.

Ariane 5’s vehicle equipment bay is hoisted for integration in the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building, in preparation for Flight VA233, the launch of four Galileo satellites. (Photo: Arianespace)

Ariane 5’s vehicle equipment bay is hoisted for integration in the Spaceport’s Launcher Integration Building, in preparation for Flight VA233, the launch of four Galileo satellites. (Photo: Arianespace)

The EPS storable propellant upper stage is powered by a re-ignitable engine that operates with MMH and N2O4 propellants. It differentiates Flight VA233’s launcher from the Ariane 5 ECA versions, which have a cryogenic upper stage and are typically used on Arianespace missions to geostationary transfer orbits with telecommunications satellites.

For Flight VA233, the Ariane 5 ES will carry the quartet of Galileo satellites (weighing 738 kg. each) and their 447-kg. dispenser system to medium-Earth orbit, for deployment at an altitude of approximately 23,222 km.

The upcoming Ariane 5 launch will mark the initial utilization of Ariane 5 in deploying Galileo constellation satellites. Flight VA233 will continue Arianespace’s support of the global positioning satellite system, following seven missions performed with the company’s medium-lift Soyuz that carries a pair of Galileo spacecraft on each flight. Seven Soyuz missions have delivered a total of 14 navigation satellites into orbit since 2011.

Galileo is a key effort for Europe, offering highly accurate positioning with great precision and reliability via a civil global satellite navigation system. The program is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. Design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure has been assigned to the European Space Agency.

The spacecraft to be launched on Flight VA233 were built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom. Airbus Defence and Space developed the dispenser system that will carry and deploy the satellites from Ariane 5.

Quelle: GPS WORLD

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Update: 22.10.2016

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Four Galileo satellites are “topped off” for Arianespace’s milestone Ariane 5 launch from the Spaceport

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The fueling of Europe’s four Galileo satellites to be orbited on Arianespace Flight VA233 is being performed in the Spaceport’s S3B payload preparation facility.

Fueling operations have begun with the four Galileo spacecraft to be orbited next month from French Guiana on Arianespace’s first launch that uses its Ariane 5 in deploying Europe’s constellation of navigation satellites.

The fueling activity is now underway in the Spaceport’s S3B payload preparation facility.  One of the first to be processed is named “Antonianna,” after an Italian child who won a European Commission Galileo drawing competition – with one winner selected from each member state of the European Union.

Weighing between 715 kg. and 717 kg. each, the quartet of Galileo satellites will have a combined liftoff mass of 2,865 kg., and they will be deployed by Ariane 5 into circular orbit during a mission lasting just under four hours.

A morning Ariane 5 launch from the Spaceport

The Ariane 5 launch, designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system, is set for a morning departure from the Spaceport on November 17 at an exact liftoff time of 10:06:48 a.m. in French Guiana (13:06:48 Universal Time – UTC).

Fueling Galileo satellites for the next Ariane 5 launch

The Galileo satellite named after “Antonianna,” an Italian child who won a European Commission Galileo drawing competition, is prepared for fueling in the Spaceport’s S3B payload processing facility.

Flight VA233 will mark Arianespace’s first use of its heavy-lift Ariane 5 to loft Galileo satellites, following seven previous missions with the company’s medium-lift Soyuz. The Soyuz vehicles carried a pair of Galileo spacecraft on each flight, delivering a total of 14 navigation satellites into orbit since 2011.

Galileo is an important infrastructure program for Europe, creating a civil global satellite navigation system that provides highly accurate positioning with great precision and reliability.

This program is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. The European Space Agency has been assigned design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure for Galileo.

OHB System in Bremen, Germany built the rectangular-shaped satellites, which are sized at 2.7 x 1.2 x 1.1 meters, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 27.10.2016

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Four Galileo ‘topped off’ for November launch

Fueling operations have begun with the four Galileo spacecraft to be launched Nov. 17 from French Guiana. This will be launch contractor Arianespace’s first launch using its Ariane 5 rocket to deploy Europe’s constellation of navigation satellites.

Fueling operations of Galileo spacecraft. (Photo: Arianespace)

Fueling operations of Galileo spacecraft. (Photo: Arianespace)

The fueling activity is now underway in the Spaceport’s S3B payload preparation facility. One of the first to be processed is named “Antonianna,” after an Italian child who won a European Commission Galileo drawing competition — with one winner selected from each member state of the European Union.

Weighing between 715 kg. and 717 kg. each, the quartet of Galileo satellites will have a combined liftoff mass of 2,865 kg., and they will be deployed by Ariane 5 into circular orbit during a mission lasting just under four hours.

The Ariane 5 launch, designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system, is set for a morning departure from the Spaceport on Nov. 17 at an exact liftoff time of 10:06:48 a.m. in French Guiana (13:06:48 p.m. Universal Time — UTC).

Flight VA233 will mark Arianespace’s first use of its heavy-lift Ariane 5 to loft Galileo satellites, following seven previous missions with the company’s medium-lift Soyuz. The Soyuz vehicles carried a pair of Galileo spacecraft on each flight, delivering a total of 14 navigation satellites into orbit since 2011.

Galileo is an important infrastructure program for Europe, creating a civil global satellite navigation system that provides highly accurate positioning with great precision and reliability.

Fueling operations of Galileo spacecraft. (Photo: Arianespace)

Fueling operations of Galileo spacecraft. (Photo: Arianespace)

This program is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. The European Space Agency has been assigned design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure for Galileo.

OHB System in Bremen, Germany built the rectangular-shaped satellites, which are sized at 2.7 x 1.2 x 1.1 meters, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

Quelle: GPSWorld

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Update: 28.10.2016

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Ariane 5 rolls out to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building in preparation for its November 17 liftoff

Ariane 5 shown on its way to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building

The Ariane 5 for Arianespace’s Flight VA233 approaches the Final Assembly Building during its transfer from the Spaceport’s Launcher Assembly Building.

Arianespace’s sixth Ariane 5 for launch this year is ready to receive its multi-satellite payload after being transferred to the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building in French Guiana.

The heavy-lift workhorse rolled out yesterday from the Launcher Integration Building – where its core cryogenic stage, two solid boosters and cryogenic upper stage were mated by production prime contractor Airbus Safran Launchers – to the Final Assembly Building, marking the formal handover to Arianespace.

Now under Arianespace’s responsibility, the launcher – an Ariane 5 ES version – is set for integration of its payload: four global positioning satellites for Europe’s Galileo navigation system.

An Ariane 5 launch for Europe

The upcoming Ariane 5 launch, designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system, is set for a morning departure from the Spaceport on November 17 at an exact liftoff time of 10:06:48 a.m. in French Guiana.

Weighing between 715 kg. and 717 kg. each, the quartet of European Galileo satellites will have a combined liftoff mass of 2,865 kg., and they will be deployed by Ariane 5 into circular orbit during a mission lasting just under four hours.

The Galileo satellites were built by OHB System in Bremen, Germany, with their navigation payloads provided by Surrey Satellite Technology in the United Kingdom.

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Galileo satellites begin their launcher hardware integration for Arianespace’s November 17 mission with Ariane 5

The launch campaign for Arianespace’s upcoming Ariane 5 flight from French Guiana has entered its latest phase of preparations, with the mission’s four Galileo satellite passengers being installed on their multi-payload dispenser system. 

Three of four Galileo satellites are being installed on their dispenser system

Two of the four Galileo satellites are shown after their installation on the multi-passenger dispenser system, with a third being positioned for its integration.

This activity – performed in the Spaceport’s S3B clean room – clears the way for the satellites’ integration as a single unit atop the heavy-lift Ariane 5, which was transferred earlier this week from the Launcher Integration Building to the Final Assembly Building, where payload integration is set to occur.

Designated Flight VA233, the upcoming mission will mark Arianespace’s first use of Ariane 5 to loft Galileo satellites, following seven previous missions with its medium-lift Soyuz. It is scheduled as the company’s ninth launch to be performed in 2016, as well as the sixth this year using the heavy-lift workhorse. Arianespace’s full launcher family is rounded out by the light-lift Vega.

Galileo: an important program for Europe

Flight VA233 is scheduled for a November 17 liftoff from the Spaceport in French Guiana at precisely 10:06:48 a.m. local time, with the four Galileo satellites subsequently being deployed into circular orbit during a mission lasting just under four hours.

Galileo is an important infrastructure program for Europe, creating a civil global satellite navigation system that provides highly accurate positioning with great precision and reliability. It is funded and owned by the European Union, with overall responsibility for management and implementation held by the European Commission. Design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure has been assigned to the European Space Agency.

OHB System in Bremen, Germany built the Galileo satellites, which are sized at 2.7 x 1.2 x 1.1 meters, while their navigation payloads were supplied by UK-based Surrey Satellite Technology.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 30.10.2016

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ariane-233-h

Quelle: ESA

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Update: 4.11.2016

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Galileo satellites “meet up” with Arianespace’s Ariane 5 for the first time

Antonianna, Lisa, Kimberley and Tijmen – the latest Galileo spacecraft for Europe’s satellite navigation constellation – have been integrated with their Ariane 5 launcher in French Guiana for a November 17 Arianespace mission. 

Ariane 5 receives its Galileo passengers

In preparation for Arianespace’s November 17 Ariane 5 mission, four Galileo satellites are lowered into position for installation atop the heavy-lift vehicle’s central core.

The four satellites – named for winners of a European children’s drawing contest – were installed this week on Ariane 5 in the Spaceport’s Final Assembly Building, in preparation for Arianespace’s 10th mission serving the Galileo program.

Designated Flight VA233 in Arianespace’s numbering system, this is the first of those missions that is using a heavy-lift Ariane 5 ES version, with the four satellites configured on a payload dispenser that will release them in pairs into circular orbit.

Supporting a key European space program

Arianespace previously has lofted 14 Full Operational Capability (FOC) and In-Orbit Validation (IOV) satellites for Galileo from French Guiana with seven missions utilizing its medium-lift Soyuz vehicle, along with two other Soyuz flights from the Baikonur Cosmodrome that deployed the GIOVE-A and GIOVE-B experimental satellites.

Galileo is a European initiative to develop a new global satellite navigation system. Under civilian control, it will offer a guaranteed, high-precision positioning service and will end Europe’s dependence on the American GPS system.

The Galileo constellation will comprise 24 operational satellites, along with spares, with 14 already orbited by Arianespace.

Sixth Ariane 5 mission of 2016 

Galileo is funded by the European Union. It features innovative technologies developed in Europe for the benefit of all citizens. The European Commission holds overall responsibility for Galileo’s management and implementation, with the European Space Agency assigned design and development of the new generation of systems and infrastructure.

Each of the spacecraft passengers for Flight VA233 weighs between 715 kg. and 717 kg., and were built by OHB System in Germany with U.K.-based Surrey Satellite Technology supplying the navigation payloads.

The November 17 Ariane 5 mission will be Arianespace’s sixth heavy-lift flight of 2016 and its ninth overall this year with its complete launcher family, which also includes the Soyuz and lightweight Vega vehicles.

Quelle: arianespace

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Update: 10.11.2016

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Galileo navigation satellites mounted atop Ariane 5 for launch next week

 
The Ariane 5's payload fairing (top) is lowered over the four Galileo satellites already fastened to their carrier module on the Ariane 5 upper stage. Credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace – Photo Optique Video du CSG – JM Guillon
The Ariane 5’s payload fairing (top) is lowered over the four Galileo satellites already fastened to their carrier module on the Ariane 5 upper stage. Credit: ESA/CNES/Arianespace – Photo Optique Video du CSG – JM Guillon

An Ariane 5 launcher uniquely modified to loft four of Europe’s Galileo navigation satellites on one flight has received its payload for liftoff next week in French Guiana.

The satellite quartet will boost the size of the Galileo fleet to 18 spacecraft. Officials say 24 satellites are needed for the European navigation network to provide global positioning and timing services independent of U.S. or Russian navigation fleets.

Liftoff is set for Nov. 17 at 1306:48 GMT (8:06:48 a.m. EST), or 10:06 a.m. local time at the European-run space base in Kourou, French Guiana.

The launch is a rare morning flight for the Ariane 5, which typically blasts off with large telecommunications satellites with evening launch windows. Next week’s mission is timed for the Ariane 5 to deploy the four new Galileo craft into a specific part of the growing navigation fleet, aiming for one of three orbital planes making up the constellation.

Owned and managed by the European Commission with technical support from the European Space Agency, the Galileo program has launched its 14 existing satellites two at a time aboard Russian-made Soyuz boosters from French Guiana.

The Ariane 5 launch next week is the first of at least three flights by the heavy-duty European-made rocket set to send up four Galileo satellites per mission.

Quelle: SN


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