Blogarchiv

Samstag, 12. März 2016 - 16:45 Uhr

Raumfahrt - ESA ExoMars Mission 2016 - Update-2

.

23.02.2016

-

23.02.2016

.

EXOMARS 2016 ORBITER AND LANDER MATED FOR MARCH LAUNCH

ExoMars Schiaparelli lander being mated with the Trace Gas Orbiter on 12 February 2016. Credit: ESA – B. Bethge
-
Earth’s lone mission to the Red Planet this year has now been assembled into launch configuration and all preparations are currently on target to support blastoff from Baikonur at the opening of the launch window on March 14, 2016.
The ambitious ExoMars 2016 mission is comprised of a pair of European spacecraft named the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and the Schiaparelli lander, built and funded by the European Space Agency (ESA).
The duo have now been assembled and mated by technicians into their final launch configuration, working in a clean room at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, for launch atop a Russian Proton rocket.
“The main objectives of this mission are to search for evidence of methane and other trace atmospheric gases that could be signatures of active biological or geological processes and to test key technologies in preparation for ESA’s contribution to subsequent missions to Mars,” says ESA.
After launch the pair will remain joined for the seven month long interplanetary journey to Mars until 16 October, at which time the Schiaparelli entry, descent and landing (EDL) demonstrator module will separate from the orbiter.
Three days later on October 19, TGO is slated to enter Mars orbit and Schiaparelli will begin its plummet through the thin Martian atmosphere and hoped for soft landing.
.
The ExoMars 2016 entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, Schiaparelli, being transported from a cleanroom to the fuelling area, in the Baikonur cosmodrome, where it will be united with the Trace Gas Orbiter on 12 February 2016. Copyright: ESA – B. Bethge
-
The mating operations commenced on February 12 with the hydrazine fueled lander in a mounting platform surrounding the orbiter that “facilitates the activities that need to be done about 4 meters off the ground,” according to ESA officials.
Over the following days, technicians then completed all the critical connections between the two spacecraft and conducted function tests to insure that all systems were operating as expected.
Specialists from the Airbus Defence and Space team also bonded the final few thermal protection tiles onto Schiaparelli. Several spots remained open during the mating operation to allow for equipment hooks to latch on and maneuver the spacecraft. With those tasks done, technician can apply the finishing touches.
.
ExoMars 2016: Trace Gas Orbiter and Schiaparelli. Credit:
ESA/ATG medialab
The launch window extends until March 25.
-
The ExoMars spacecraft will join ESA’s only other Red Planet probe – the Mars Express orbiter – which arrived in 2004 and continues to function well to this day.
The ExoMars 2016 orbiter is equipped with a payload of four science instruments. It will investigate the source and precisely measure the quantity of the methane and other trace gases.
The orbiter was built in Europe and the instruments are provided by European and Russian scientists.
Methane (CH4) gas is the simplest organic molecule and very low levels have reportedly been detected in the thin Martian atmosphere. But the data are not certain and its origin is not clear cut.
Methane could be a marker either for active living organisms today or it could originate from non life geologic processes. On Earth more than 90% of the methane originates from biological sources.
The 2016 lander will carry an international suite of science instruments and test European landing technologies for the 2nd ExoMars mission.
The 2018 ExoMars mission will deliver an advanced rover to the Red Planet’s surface. It is equipped with the first ever deep driller that can collect samples to depths of 2 meters where the environment is shielded from the harsh conditions on the surface – namely the constant bombardment of cosmic radiation and the presence of strong oxidants like perchlorates that can destroy organic molecules.
Stay tuned here for Ken’s continuing Earth and planetary science and human spaceflight news.
Quelle: UT

-

SAVE THE DATE: EXOMARS 2016 LAUNCH EVENT

Save the date: the next flight to Mars is departing soon.
The ExoMars 2016 mission, a joint endeavour between ESA and Roscosmos, is targeting launch at 09:30 GMT on 14 March on a Proton-M/Breeze-M from Baikonur.
Online registration for a dedicated media day at ESA’s operations centre, ESOC, in Darmstadt, Germany, will soon be available via esa.int.
Media representatives as well as social media influencers will be eligible to apply for accreditation to attend the launch event. Note that there is no dedicated social media event; those attending with social media accreditation will be accorded the same access to the event and expert interview partners as traditional/online news media (eligibility requirements will be available soon).
Applicants should already bear in mind that the event at ESOC will take place between approximately 07:00 and 22:00 GMT. In addition to launch coverage in the morning, an extensive programme of speakers is being prepared for the afternoon. The final, fourth-stage rocket burn and separation of the spacecraft, including the first acquisition of signal, is expected later in the evening.
The full programme outline and application details will be available next week.
.
Artist's impression visualising the separation of the ExoMars entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, Schiaparelli, from the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO).
The separation is scheduled to occur on 16 October 2016, about seven months after launch. Schiaparelli is set to enter the martian atmosphere on 19 October, while TGO will enter orbit around Mars.
.
The ExoMars 2016 Trace Gas Orbiter being fuelled at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
In March, Europe’s new era of Mars exploration begins with the launch of the Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) and Schiaparelli. After a seven-month journey through space, Schiaparelli will separate from the orbiter on 16 October and head towards the planet’s surface, where it will land three days later, on Meridiani Planum.
Meanwhile, the orbiter will begin to manoeuvre into orbit and, after a year of aerobraking, will begin science operations.
Any long journey requires an ample supply of fuel and, 21 February, fuelling of TGO began. This spacecraft has one fuel tank and one oxidiser tank, each with a capacity of 1207 litres. When fuelling is complete, the tanks will contain about 1.5 tonnes of MON (mixed oxides of nitrogen) and 1 tonne of MMH (monomethylhydrazine).
The propellant is needed for the main engine and the 10 thrusters (plus 10 backup thrusters) that are used for fine targeting and critical manoeuvres.
Even the propellants have had a long journey: both were procured via Gerling Holz in Germany, brought by ship to St Petersburg in Russia, and then by train to the cosmodrome, in Kazakhstan.
Since fuelling is a hazardous exercise, only essential staff – wearing protective suits – are allowed in the fuelling area. A team from Thales Alenia Space France is in Baikonur to take care of TGO fuelling, as they did for Schiaparelli. While this activity is under way, the fire brigade, doctor, security and safety officers are on hand.
Quelle: ESA

-

Update: 4.03.2016

.

EXOMARS 2016 SPACECRAFT ENCAPSULATED WITHIN LAUNCHER FAIRING
-
With less than two weeks until the launch of ExoMars 2016, preparations are proceeding well and the spacecraft composite has now been encapsulated within the launcher fairing at the Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.
Earlier this week the spacecraft composite, comprised of the Trace Gas Orbiter and Schiaparelli, was mated with the launch vehicle adapter and installed on top of the Breeze upper stage. Yesterday, 2 March, the Breeze upper stage and spacecraft were encapsulated together within the two fairing halves. Prior to the encapsulation, they were tilted horizontally and the first fairing half was rolled underneath the spacecraft and Breeze, on a track inside the cleanroom. The second fairing half was then lowered into place by means of an overhead crane, encapsulating the payload.
.
Quelle: ESA

-

Update: 8.03.2016

.

Drei Tage vor der Ankunft beim Mars: Von der Muttersonde Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) trennt sich das Landemodul Schiaparelli und fliegt autonom zum Roten Planeten

-

Sonnenaufgang auf dem Mars: 400 Kilometer über der Oberfläche richtet eine Raumsonde im Orbit ihre Instrumente in Richtung des Sonnenlichts, das durch die Atmosphäre des Planeten strömt.
Sie ist auf der Suche nach den spektralen Signaturen wichtiger Gase wie Methan, die auf noch heute aktive biologische oder geologische Vorgänge hinweisen können. Zur gleichen Zeit ist ein Fahrzeug auf der Oberfläche dabei, mit einem Bohrer die erste Bodenprobe aus einer Tiefe von zwei Metern zu entnehmen. Das Gefährt befindet sich in einer Region, die in der Frühzeit des Planeten vor rund vier Milliarden Jahren mit flüssigem Wasser bedeckt war. Wird es Reste vergangenen Lebens finden, die vor der energiereichen Strahlung geschützt waren, welche heute die Oberfläche überflutet?
Seit Jahrhunderten ist die Menschheit von der Suche nach Leben auf dem Mars fasziniert, angefangen von Künstlern und Schriftstellern bis hin zu den Forschern und Astronomen. Obwohl das obige Szenario wie eine Szene aus einem Sciencefictionroman wirkt, wird es bald Realität dank des Programms ExoMars.
ExoMars ist ein gemeinsames Projekt der Europäischen Raumfahrtagentur ESA und der russischen Weltraumbehörde Roskosmos. Es besteht aus zwei Missionen: Die erste, die Mitte März 2016 startet, beinhaltet den so genannten Trace Gas Orbiter (Orbiter für Spurengase, kurz: TGO) und ein Landemodul namens Schiaparelli, das Verfahren für eine weiche Landung auf dem Mars erproben soll. 
Die zweite Mission, die 2018 folgen wird, besteht aus einem Marsrover und einer Landeplattform mit wissenschaftlichen Instrumenten. Die Hauptaufgabe des Programms ExoMars ist die Beantwortung der Frage, ob der Mars einstmals belebt war oder gar immer noch ist.
Dabei möchten die Forscher erfahren, ob der Planet heute noch geologisch aktiv ist oder sich dort Hinweise auf einfaches mikrobielles Leben finden lassen. Jedoch ist es noch gar nicht so lange her, dass sich die Spekulationen hierüber regelrecht überschlugen und viele Menschen annahmen, auf unserem Nachbarplaneten gäbe es intelligentes Leben.
Das ExoMars-Modul für die Testlandung ist nach dem italienischen Astronomen Giovanni Schiaparelli benannt
Diese Fantasien wurden verstärkt durch die Fehlinterpretation teleskopischer Beobachtungen des italienischen Astronomen Giovanni Schiaparelli (1835 – 1910) gegen Ende des 19. Jahrhunderts: Er hatte auf dem Planeten helle und dunkle gerade Linien wahrgenommen, die er im Italienischen als »canali« bezeichnete. Diese wurden fälschlicherweise im Englischen und anderen Sprachen als »Kanäle« anstatt als »Furchen« oder »Rillen« übersetzt. Dadurch drängte sich das Bild eines Netzwerks aus Bewässerungskanälen auf, die vermeintlich von intelligenten Wesen auf dem Mars errichtet wurden.
Nach Giovanni Schiaparelli ist nun das ExoMars-Modul für die Testlandung benannt, dessen offizielle Bezeichnung sonst »Entry, descent and landing demonstrator« lautet, auf Deutsch ungefähr: »Modul zur Demonstration des Eintritts, Abstiegs und Aufsetzens auf der Marsoberfläche«.
Schließlich fotografierten im 20. Jahrhundert Raumsonden die Marsoberfläche im Detail und räumten mit dem Missverständnis der Kanäle auf: Die von Schiaparelli gesichteten geraden Strukturen waren nur optische Täuschungen gewesen. Jedoch nahmen die Wissenschaftler weiterhin an, dass es auf dem Mars Mikroorganismen geben könnte. Tatsächlich machte sich im Jahr 1976 das US-Programm Viking daran, mittels zweier Landesonden mit speziellen Instrumenten nach Stoffwechselprodukten von Mikroben im Marsboden zu suchen.
Nachdem dies erfolglos blieb, stellten die Forscher auf eine stufenweise Forschungsstrategie um. Schon aus den Beobachtungen des Planeten mit den beiden Viking-Orbitern war klar geworden, dass Wasser – die Grundbedingung für die Entstehung von Leben, wie wir es kennen – eine große Rolle bei der Gestaltung der Marsoberfläche gespielt hatte. Tatsächlich wiesen verzweigte Netzwerke aus Tälern – ähnlich jenen, die durch Regenfälle in den irdischen Wüsten entstehen – und uralte ausgetrocknete Flussbetten und -rinnen darauf hin.
Daraus ergab sich in der Folgezeit das Mantra »Folge dem Wasser«. Aber heute ist die Marsoberfläche kalt, trocken und starker Strahlung ausgesetzt, so dass dort Organismen nicht überleben würden. Könnte sich aber Leben während früherer feuchter Umweltphasen vor Milliarden von Jahren auf dem Mars eingenistet haben?
Dies ist bis heute eine der wichtigsten ungelösten wissenschaftlichen Fragen unserer Zeit. Sie beflügelte zahlreiche Missionen zum Mars, seitdem die Menschheit damit begann, den Roten Planeten zu erkunden. Mehr als 40 Raumsonden wurden in Richtung Mars gestartet, freilich mit sehr unterschiedlichem Erfolg. Obwohl sich unser Verständnis des Mars seitdem gewaltig verbessert hat, haben wir noch immer keine Antwort auf diese Kernfrage.
Mehr als 40 Raumsonden sind bereits in Richtung Mars gestartet 
Europa war an zahlreichen Marsmissionen beteiligt, die von den USA, Russland und Japan durchgeführt wurden. Die erste eigene Mission, Mars Express, begann im Jahr 2003. Sie führte zudem die britische Landesonde Beagle-2 mit, die sich erfolgreich von der Muttersonde trennte, dann aber verschollen blieb.
Mars Express war auf eine Betriebsdauer von zwei Jahren im Marsumlauf ausgelegt, ist aber nach mehr als zwölf Jahren noch immer aktiv. Eine der interessantesten Beobachtungen in ihrer eindrucksvollen Karriere war der Nachweis von Methan in der Marsatmosphäre. Diese Entdeckung sollte die Keimzelle für die Entwicklung des Trace Gas Orbiter (TGO) des ExoMars-Programms werden. Auf der Erde setzen vor allem lebende Organismen einen Großteil des atmosphärischen Methans frei.
Es ist zudem der Hauptbestandteil von Erdgas; ein weiterer Beitrag stammt aus der vulkanischen und hydrothermalen Aktivität unseres Planeten. Obwohl Methan weniger als 0,000 18 Prozent der Gase in der Erdatmosphäre ausmacht (oder 18 Teile pro Milliarde Teilchen pro Volumeneinheit = 18 ppbv), gelangen pro Jahr mehrere hundert Millionen Tonnen in unsere Lufthülle. 
Da die biologische Aktivität der Erde eine Schlüsselrolle für die Methanproduktion spielt, ist der sichere Nachweis von Methan auf dem Mars ein erster wichtiger Schritt, die derzeit aktiven Prozesse zu verstehen, welche dort dieses Gas erzeugen und auch wieder entfernen. In der Marsatmosphäre sollte das Methan nur eine recht kurze Lebensdauer von rund 400 Jahren haben, da es durch die ultraviolette Strahlung der Sonne zerstört wird. Mischungsvorgänge in der Atmosphäre sollten dafür sorgen, dass sich rasch ein mehr oder weniger einheitlicher Methangehalt auf geringem Niveau einstellt. Sollte dies richtig sein, so müsste es eine Quelle geben, die den Vorrat ständig auffüllt, und gleichzeitig ein Vorgang aktiv sein, der das Methan wieder rasch entfernt. Nur so lassen sich die beobachteten Veränderungen der Methankonzentrationen erklären.
Endlich diese Vorgänge zu verstehen, ist eines der aufregendsten Ziele des Trace Gas Orbiters. Sie sind ein Rätsel, das es zu lösen gilt. Tatsächlich ist es eine Hauptaufgabe für TGO, eine große Anzahl von Spurengasen in der Marsatmosphäre gleichzeitig zu analysieren. Sie sind dort nur in geringen Mengen vorhanden und machen wesentlich weniger als ein Prozent der Gesamtzusammensetzung aus. Es sind die Beziehungen zwischen den verschiedenen Spurengasen, die uns Einblicke in den möglichen Ursprung von Methan und anderen interessanten Gase bieten dürften, sei er biologischer oder geothermaler Natur.
TGO führt zudem das Testmodul Schiaparelli mit sich, das Schlüsseltechnologien im Hinblick auf die nächste Mission des ExoMars-Programms erproben wird, die schon oben erwähnte Mission ExoMars-2018. 
.
Some of the team at Baikonur who are preparing the ExoMars 2016 spacecraft for launch, pictured in front of the Proton rocket.
The Trace Gas Orbiter and the entry, descent and landing demonstrator module, called Schiaparelli, are inside the fairing (with the ExoMars logo).
The image was taken 5 March at the Baikonur cosmodrome, Kazakhstan.
Quelle: ESA

.

Update: 11.03.2016

.

Inzwischen steht die Proton-M senkrecht auf Launchpad 200 in Baikonur. Start: Montag, 10:31 MEZ

Quelle: ESA

...

Update: 12.03.2016

.

MISSION CONTROL READY FOR MARS LAUNCH
 -
Counting down to final countdown
-
ESA’s mission control conducted the dress rehearsal for the ExoMars launch today, an important final step in preparing the ground teams and systems for the 14 March departure to the Red Planet.
Next Monday, the ESA–Roscosmos ExoMars 2016 mission is set to lift off from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on a Russian Proton rocket, marking the start of a seven-month journey to the Red Planet (follow live updates; more information on ExoMars).
Today, the ‘team of teams’ comprising the flight engineers and specialists at ESA’s ESOC control centre in Darmstadt, Germany, who will fly the ExoMars orbiter, performed the dress rehearsal, a crucial final step before any launch.
The realistic, eight-hour practice began at 02:00 GMT (03:00 CET) to conform to the tight schedule of the Roscosmos launch team at Baikonur.
Rehearsing for final countdown
In Darmstadt, mission controllers worked in the centre’s Main Control Room, using the actual mission control systems and ground tracking stations that will be employed on launch day and during flight, stepping through the preflight procedures while following the minute-to-minute network countdown to the moment of liftoff.
Teams established a live data connection with TGO on top of the Proton rocket in Baikonur, and could receive telemetry and other status data from the spacecraft, which was also undergoing its own preflight software loading and countdown rehearsal.
“Today’s rehearsal is one of the final steps in being ready to go – we do a similar dress rehearsal for every launch,” says Paolo Ferri, Head of Mission Operations.
“It’s a milestone that caps off several years of preparation for any complex mission – designing, building and testing the ground systems, preparing the flight operations procedures and then finally an intensive period of team training.”
Specialists from areas such as flight dynamics, ground stations, ground software and systems also took part in the rehearsal, sitting in their own control rooms and working together via voice and data loops between each other and to the launch control centre at Baikonur and the ground stations.
Representatives from Thales Alenia Space, leading the European industrial grouping that built ExoMars and Schiaparelli, and from ESA’s ExoMars project office, also took part.
.
Twelve missions in space and nine in preparation
Readying to conduct the ExoMars mission comes at a time when ESA’s operations teams are seeing an historically high level of activity.
Twelve missions, for a total of 17 spacecraft, are now in flight, spanning science, Earth observation, orbiting observatories and Europe’s Galileo and Copernicus programmes, while nine new missions are being prepared.
“In 2016, at least five new missions are expected to be launched – a record for ESOC – plus two spectacular interplanetary highlights in the autumn: ExoMars arrival at Mars, and the controlled impact of Rosetta on its comet,” says Rolf Densing, ESA’s Director for Operations and head of the ESOC centre.
Quelle: ESA
.



Tags: Raumfahrt 

1526 Views